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'Rocket League' cars are the new hot wheels
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In Rocket League you slam around a Thunderdome-style pitch in hot rally cars while trying to smash a gigantic “rocket ball” into a goal… Basically, it’s the perfect marriage of soccer and demolition derby. Now imagine bringing that into the real world with these new tiny replicas of the digital autos from the hit game itself.

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Venture Beat: Nintendo Received Almost 1.2 Billion TV Ad Impressions In November

Venture Beat: Nintendo Received Almost 1.2 Billion TV Ad Impressions In November

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Venture Beatand iSpot.tv have new data on video gaming TV advertising, including the top 5 most-seen gaming industry TV advertisers. This data is for the month of November, which includes the start of the holiday season. With the holiday season now here, Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo have been advertising their hardware more than ever. However, the top 5 chart has not changed in the past month.…

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Venture Beat: Nintendo Received Almost 1.2 Billion TV Ad Impressions In November

Venture Beat: Nintendo Received Almost 1.2 Billion TV Ad Impressions In November

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Venture Beatand iSpot.tv have new data on video gaming TV advertising, including the top 5 most-seen gaming industry TV advertisers. This data is for the month of November, which includes the start of the holiday season. With the holiday season now here, Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo have been advertising their hardware more than ever. However, the top 5 chart has not changed in the past month.…

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VentureBeat: Nintendo Received 387,600,000 TV Ad Impressions From July 16th Through August 15th

VentureBeat: Nintendo Received 387,600,000 TV Ad Impressions From July 16th Through August 15th

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VentureBeat has the latest data on the top five most-seen gaming industry TV advertisers. This data is for the period of July 16th through August 15th. VentureBeat reports that FoxNext Games has knocked Nintendo off of its #1 spot, generating 426,700,000 million impressions off of a single commercial, “Assemble Your Squad”. The commercial aired over 3,700 times.

As for Nintendo, it is at #2.…

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VentureBeat: Nintendo Received 387,600,000 TV Ad Impressions From July 16th Through August 15th

VentureBeat: Nintendo Received 387,600,000 TV Ad Impressions From July 16th Through August 15th

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VentureBeat has the latest data on the top five most-seen gaming industry TV advertisers. This data is for the period of July 16th through August 15th. VentureBeat reports that FoxNext Games has knocked Nintendo off of its #1 spot, generating 426,700,000 million impressions off of a single commercial, “Assemble Your Squad”. The commercial aired over 3,700 times.

As for Nintendo, it is at #2.…

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VentureBeat: Nintendo Was #1 In Gaming Industry Television Ad Spending In July 2018

VentureBeat: Nintendo Was #1 In Gaming Industry Television Ad Spending In July 2018

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The latest gaming industry television ad spending data has been released. This data applies for the month of July 2018. Nintendo was the #1 provider of gaming industry television ad spending in July.  31.7% of July’s gaming television ad spending came from Nintendo. Sony and Microsoft did not make an appearance in this month’s Top 5 gaming ad spending chart.

According to VentureBeat, “Nintendo…

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VentureBeat: Nintendo Was #1 In Gaming Industry Television Ad Spending In July 2018

VentureBeat: Nintendo Was #1 In Gaming Industry Television Ad Spending In July 2018

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The latest gaming industry television ad spending data has been released. This data applies for the month of July 2018. Nintendo was the #1 provider of gaming industry television ad spending in July.  31.7% of July’s gaming television ad spending came from Nintendo. Sony and Microsoft did not make an appearance in this month’s Top 5 gaming ad spending chart.

According to VentureBeat, “Nintendo…

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VentureBeat: Nintendo Was The Third Most-Seen Gaming Industry TV Advertiser From May 16th Through June 15th, 2018

VentureBeat: Nintendo Was The Third Most-Seen Gaming Industry TV Advertiser From May 16th Through June 15th, 2018

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Earlier this month, we let you know of the releaseof some TV advertising data for Nintendo. Well, VentureBeat has put out some more data. This time, the data applies for the time period from May 16th through June 15th. During that period, Nintendo was the third most-seen gaming industry TV advertiser, Nintendo had “18 spots that aired over 3,300 times”. This resulted in the company generating…

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VentureBeat: Nintendo Was The Third Most-Seen Gaming Industry TV Advertiser From May 16th Through June 15th, 2018

VentureBeat: Nintendo Was The Third Most-Seen Gaming Industry TV Advertiser From May 16th Through June 15th, 2018

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Earlier this month, we let you know of the releaseof some TV advertising data for Nintendo. Well, VentureBeat has put out some more data. This time, the data applies for the time period from May 16th through June 15th. During that period, Nintendo was the third most-seen gaming industry TV advertiser, Nintendo had “18 spots that aired over 3,300 times”. This resulted in the company generating…

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anonymous asked:

who is dean takahashi and what did he do

Dean Takahashi is a writer in the game industry. I first heard about him because he wrote a handful of books about behind-the-scenes game industry stuff, one called “Opening the Xbox,” about the launch of the original Xbox, which he followed up with “The Xbox 360 Uncloaked″ four years later. He now works at VentureBeat in their gaming section, GamesBeat.

In the run up to the release of Cuphead, a video from GamesBeat at a press preview event surfaced of Dean playing the game and unreasonably struggling to pass the tutorial, clearly ignoring the text printed on screen. He eventually gets through it and on to the game itself, but it takes him a while to learn even the most simple concepts.

This video spread like wildfire as a clear example of how “out of touch” the “game journalists” are. “They” aren’t even good at video games! They’re unfit for their jobs! Rabble rabble rabble! It touched one of those weird nerves in this industry where the fans of games are at odds with the people who get paid to write about games and neither side seems to get along.

And there’s just so, so, so much to unpack and talk about. It’s a delicate issue, too – previously I’ve talked about this from the side that people in the games press are bad at staying connected to their fanbase, and that today’s scorned fans could be tomorrow’s rising stars that are stealing the jobs of the people they once idolized. Once you reach a certain level of popularity, there’s a “don’t read the comments” rule most people subscribe to that I genuinely don’t like.

I’m really starting to think one of the reasons gaming can be so toxic is BECAUSE nobody driving the bus actually pays attention to the type of community they’re cultivating around them. They just see their fanbase as one big group of incoherently screeching monkeys and your viewpoint has to be way more nuanced than that. It’s dehumanizing to be treated that way, and I know because I used to be that guy seven, eight, nine years ago. You try to connect with someone you admire over social media or whatever, and after they ignore you, you just kind of get louder. You try harder to grab their attention. And the more you get ignored, the easier it is to get angry about being ignored. That frustration just grows, and grows, and grows, until you’re saying things you don’t really mean, because it’s not like they’re paying attention to you anyway, right? You may not even realize it (I certainly didn’t), but you’ve started acting like a jerk, hoping to get them to do anything.

And time and time again, you hear stories of even the most minor celebrities finally acknowledging an angry fan, and all of that frustration and booming vitriol just vanishes. They instantly turn back in to a real person again. They exist, to their hero. That’s all they really wanted. Even if it’s just wordless eye contact, that might be good enough. They wanted confirmation of existence from somebody they admire. They needed to hear, “Yes, you are a human.” Because that makes them human.

Instead, you get “Don’t read the comments.” Shun the people who love you. It breeds a universal contempt in these people who went out of their way to leave a comment on your article. Suddenly their default response for all internet celebrities is screeching for attention they never expect to get, because true enough, nobody “worth a damn” gives them the time of day. Truly, they can say anything and get away with it. It’s almost like Lord of the Flies.

Which turns in to what I’d maybe describe as the “witch hunt” Dean Takahashi briefly experienced over this Cuphead stuff. Because now the peanut gallery had a verifiable, concrete example that “these people” don’t really care about games. Years of being ignored, being made fun of by their heroes, all of it suddenly crystalizes when they have a real, genuine demonstration of fact to show their friends about how game industry writers are taking this industry for granted. Dean Takahashi doesn’t know how to play Cuphead. Our beloved Cuphead. Cuphead, winner of a steadily increasing pile of trophies and awards for artistic excellence. How dare he be so presumptuous as to get away with this ruse.

To which I say: who cares if Dean Takahashi sucks at Cuphead?

Browse Rotten Tomatoes. Of the critics it tracks, how many do you think have ever written, directed, or produced their own movie? Never mind a good movie, just any movie at all. Probably less than 10%. Roger Ebert briefly tried his hand at writing movies after becoming famous as a critic, all of which were regarded as abysmal. He still went down as one of the most famous movie critics in the country.

Want something more comparable to video games? Look at ESPN. They hire ex-pro players for play-by-play color commentary, but when they want in-depth articles written about the actual sports industry, they hire real journalists who are good at writing, not at sports. I’m sure if you asked Shaun Assael to get in the ring at UFC he’d be brutalized by his opponent almost instantly, but he wrote a fantastic article about one of the biggest bank robberies in modern history that was masterminded by a UFC fighter from London. Assael doesn’t need to be a UFC fighter himself to accurately tell that story.

You hire writers to write. It doesn’t matter what profession they’re writing about, you want somebody who is good at prose. You don’t need to be good at the subject you’re writing about to be able to write about it. Never have been, never will be. This is a standard spanning multiple writing mediums and hundreds of years.

Dean Takahashi sucking at Cuphead doesn’t mean anything more than Dean Takahashi sucks at Cuphead. This is not proof that game industry writers “don’t care” about their audience. That’s a much deeper, much bigger systemic problem than I (or anyone else) can grasp. Give Dean a break, and give anyone else who flails at a game a break. They aren’t insulting you, and you don’t know what it’s like trying to play a game at a press event. A little empathy will go a long way.

And that goes in reverse, too. Read the comments, journalists. Put on your big kid pants and brave the dark depths. If you dehumanize your fans enough, eventually they’ll never be human again.

If somebody out there has ever read anything I wrote and left a comment I never responded to, I am sorry. You exist. And I thank you for existing, and for leaving that comment. You lift me up, even if I don’t necessarily have anything of value to respond with.

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Venturebeat Can’t Cuphead - Games Journalism Fail

DavidGX

Banks are increasingly sensitive to the brand damage caused by IT failings, perceiving customers to care just as deeply about security and stable service as loan or deposit rates. Former RBS Chief Executive Stephen Hester waived his bonus in 2012 over a failed software update which caused chaos for thousands of bank customers. And HSBC issued multiple apologies to customers after its UK personal banking websites were shuttered by a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack, following earlier unrelated IT glitches.
—  Lawrence White, ‘British banks fail to report hacks in order to protect their image’, VentureBeat