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Your Tuesday Recap. Who's that knocking? announces their credit card coming soon.



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The top 20 most annoying tech problems

One in eight British people have broken their gadgets or tech in a fit of rage, a survey claims.

Commissioned by online mobile and tech supporter Wiztek, the poll of 2,000 adults found that many people have lost patience with their tech devices at some point.

On average, those polled said they will experience 63 IT issues a year – including intermittent WiFi, endless pop-up adverts and paper jams in printers.

And typically they will begin to become frustrated after spending 12 minutes trying to fix technical problems.

A third of those surveyed said that they have become so tired of dealing with these problems that they have purchased a completely new device instead of getting their old one repaired.

One in five have even fallen out with their partner as a direct result of their phone, computer or tablet not working as it should.

Paul Amsellem, CEO of Wiztek, said: “Tech is an integral part of lives – whether it be through our jobs or through our home lives.

“And as such, we’d be significantly hampered in our daily lives – unable to check emails for important messages, use sat nav to successfully get from A to B or to keep track of appointments.

“So when our devices stop working or don’t operate as they should it understandably becomes very frustrating.”

Over 45 per cent of those polled said they are not very knowledgeable when it comes to resolving computer and tech issues.

And three in ten say they have made the problem worse when trying to fix their gadgets.

The study also found that 40 per cent of the population has been left unable to work following problems with IT equipment.

And 25 per cent have lost important files such as cherished family photos and key documents as a direct result of a tech failure.

Mr Amsellem added: “Tech and computing issues are such a minefield – there’s so many possible causes to everyday problems, even the most knowledgeable of people can get stumped from time to time.

“Downtime from tech problems can lead to many wasted hours and in today’s society where we are all so busy, time costs money.“

The top 20 most annoying tech problems

1. Slow internet

2. Slow computer

3. Pop-up ads

4. WiFi keeps disconnecting

5. Forgotten password

6. Slow downloads

7. Software updates making things worse

8. Can’t login

9. Printer won’t work

10. Phone battery keeps dying quickly

11. Accidentally deleting something important

12. App keeps on crashing

13. Paper jams

14. "Blue screen of death”

15. Can’t open email attachments

16. Keep seeing “there is a problem with this website’s security certificate”

17. Ink not printing properly

18. Hard drive failure

19. Remembering where you stored particular files/data

20. Running out of hard drive space

SWNS

Apple announces Apple Card credit card

At Apple’s “show time” services event today, it announced a new Apple Card credit card, promising to improve things about the credit card experience with simpler applications, no fees, lower interest rates, and better rewards.

To get an Apple Card, users will be able to sign up on their iPhone in the Apple Wallet app and get a digital card that they can use anywhere Apple Pay is accepted “within minutes.” Customers will also be able to track purchases, check balances, and see when their bill is due right from the app. There will be a physical titanium card, too, but there’s no credit card number, CVV, expiration date, or signature. All of that authorization information is stored directly in the Apple Wallet app.

Apple also says that it’ll use machine learning and Apple Maps to label stores that you use in the app, and use that data to track purchases across categories like “food and drink” or “shopping.”

Instead of a points-based reward program, Apple Card gives cash back rewards in the form of Daily Cash, which is applied straight to your Apple Card to spend or put toward your purchases. Apple is offering 2 percent cash back on purchases made through Apple Pay using an Apple Card, and purchases from Apple will get 3 percent cash back. Purchases made through the physical card will get just 1 percent cash back, though.

As rumored, Apple is partnering with Goldman Sachs for Apple Card, with Mastercard handling payment processing. Additionally, the company is promising that there will be “no late fees, no annual fees, no international fees, and no over limit fees” with the Apple Card and “lower interest rates” with no penalties for missing payments, with APR rates ranging from 13.24 percent to 24.24 percent based on credit. (The company also notes that “late or missed payments will result in additional interest accumulating toward the customer’s balance.”)

Like many of Apple’s products, privacy is a big push here. “Apple doesn’t know what you bought, where you bought it, and how much you paid for it,” said Jennifer Bailey, VP of Apple Pay. All of the spending tracking and other information is stored directly on the device, not Apple’s servers. The company also promises that “Goldman Sachs will never sell your data to third parties for marketing and advertising.”

By Chaim Gartenberg