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The shape of stories by Kurt Vonnegut * * *













Another brain storming meeting with my Co writer Georgia. So many ideas starting to come together now. Can't wait to get a draft going.







Every story has a problem and a solution. The way characters in a story respond to major challenges helps tell the story. Even when the characters are absolute monsters!







How to organize writing notes: Break into sections, then structure the parts.




Edit before you write. Save hours in the writing process by using to hit your word count — first time, every time.







Let me know if anyone has any questions about this thread ! Here's the full post: I've leave you with one final tip: The struggles that the characters endured should make them stronger.



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You’ve written your , now how can you test whether it’s as good as it can be? John Yorke recommends 10 questions. . . Learn advanced screenwriting with the UK's foremost narrative expert: . .




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Train yourself to write (even a little) every day, as regularly as brushing your teeth! P.S. And get a copy of my new book: ! 😁



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You’ve written your , now how can you test whether it’s as good as it can be? John Yorke recommends 10 questions. . . Learn advanced screenwriting with the UK's foremost narrative expert: . .




You’ve written your , now how can you test whether it’s as good as it can be? John Yorke recommends 10 questions. . . Learn advanced screenwriting with the UK's foremost narrative expert: . .







How you can apply the five-act structure techniques of Jaws and Ronald Reagan's famous speech to business storytelling and keep people engaged with your organisation: . .






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Terribly Happy

I was watching one of my favorite movies, Terribly Happy, when a major development in the very limited understanding of story happened in my brain.

I highly suggest you check out the trailer. I describe it to friends as “what Hot Fuzz would be like if the Coen Brothers had made it.” Coincidentally, it’s on Hulu right now.

I think I always look for a break into the 2nd Act to be some sort of external change that happens TO a character. In Terribly Happy, the life-changing action happened before the movie started.

For the first act, we have learned HOW a character is, but not WHY. Then, at 34 minutes, we learn that our protagonist Hansen has pulled a gun on his estranged wife. We have seen hints at some past damage– he has a photograph of his daughter, he repeatedly calls his ex-wife– but we don’t know the backstory until this point. We know some trauma has deeply affected him, and now we see it.

This is a fantastic roll-out of information. This is great structure. The inciting incident has already occurred, but the audience is just catching up to the characters. Our revelation was not in Hansen’s world or even in his mind. It was what the audience knew about Hansen that he had known all along.

And, just like we should expect from a break into the second act, Hansen makes a new choice.

It was at this point in the movie that I was reminded of “Beginnings - Setting a Story in Motion” by Michael Arndt, the screenwriter of Toy Story 3.

Hansen will be asked the same question he was asked in the first act (should he punish a juvenile shoplifter with corporal punishment, as the locals suggest, or should he abide by the law, as his nature as the local law enforcement requires?), but now he will make the opposite choice he has made before.

He will make the FUN choice.

He will make the WRONG choice.

And we WANT him to do it.

Story comes from the character’s desires and fears.

First we show the Character doing what they LOVE*

Then we show the Character’s “Grand Flaw”

The flaw comes from taking their love too far

Then we warn about conflict to come

Then the world radically changes

Their LOVE* is taken from them

Their expectations about the future are taken from them

And, to add insult to injury, the world seems fundamentally unfair

Now the Character has two roads:

If they make the right choice, then we have no story

But we want them to make the unhealthy choice, because it is what they LOVE*