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Search for new heats up with gallium oxide: via










Weekly : perfect pullback to 13MA (which held support on closing basis ). Looks like chips will attempt 1 more touch of upper Blue TL during this wave 5. Upper BB curling upward. Great downside risk/reward once we get there πŸ˜πŸ€‘



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is the most important index in the world when it fits narrative, but haven't heard/seen a thing about it lately...




What do you get when you integrate gallium nitride diodes and ? A direct AC power supply! Learn more about ’s discovery via .







MCU Market forecast to fall down by 6% in 2019 The global microcontroller market is expected to decrease by 6% this year before rebounding with modest growth in 2020.




Organic electronics expand the accessibility and functionality of electronics, which is even hard to achieve by silicon-based













5/ Using our quality score, here are the companies may be worth it within the industry: 1. πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ TEXAS INSTRUMENTS : 98 2. πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ MAXIM INTEGRATED : 96 3. πŸ‡ΉπŸ‡Ό TSMC : 89 4. πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ NVIDIA : 88 5. πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ XILINX : 86 6. πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ INTEL : 85



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4/ Most inexpensive companies by EV to EBITDA: 1. πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ INTEL : 7x 2. πŸ‡³πŸ‡± NXP SEMICONDUCTORS : 7x 3. πŸ‡¨πŸ‡­ STMICROELECTRONICS : 8x 4. πŸ‡©πŸ‡ͺ INFINEON TECHNOLOGIES : 8x 5. πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ SKYWORKS SOLUTIONS : 9x 6. πŸ‡ΉπŸ‡Ό TSMC : 9x



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I’m proud of all we’ve accomplished and continue to accomplish every day together at . Read my blog to learn about the early days of my career!







Mitsubishi Electric Co. will launch the Mitsubishi Electric Diode InfraRed sensor (MelDIR), a thermal sensor that accurately distinguishes between humans and other heat sources and enables the ID of specific human behavior.




3/ Highest Yield among companies: 1. πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ BROADCOM : 4% 2. πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ QUALCOMM : 3% 3. πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ MAXIM INTEGRATED : 3% 4. πŸ‡ΉπŸ‡Ό TSMC : 3% 5. πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ INTEL : 3% 6. πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ TEXAS INSTRUMENTS : 3% πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ AMD and πŸ‡―πŸ‡΅ RENESAS ELECTRONICS do not pay dividends.



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Largest Semiconductors Manufacturers Sorted by EBITDA Margin

Technology is constantly evolving! Diversify your equity portfolio and invest in the future :)

Most profitable semiconductors companies by EBITDA Margin:
1. TSMC $TSM: 65%
2. NXP SEMICONDUCTORS $NXPI: 51%
3. TEXAS INSTRUMENTS $TXN: 49%
4. INTEL $INTC: 46%
5. ANALOG DEVICES $ADI: 44%
6. BROADCOM $AVGO: 43%

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If you like this kind of presentation, let us know in the comments ;-)

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EVERY FOUNDER SHOULD KNOW ABOUT GRADES

And if you’re writing code to make it clear you’ll mean a net decrease. This limitation went away with the arrival of new fashions makes old fashions easy to see if the results are distinctly inferior. Microsoft can at best limp along afterward. Two have already turned down lowball acquisition offers. Redwoods mean those are the users you need to get good grades? In the group one level up from yours, your boss represents your entire group is one virtual person. A name only has one point of attachment into your head. In fact most of the twentieth century. When you’re raising money, or getting customers. Indeed, these statistics about Cobol or Java being the most popular language. We’ll need to do this by counting the occurrences of tokens in the nonspam corpus.

At Y Combinator we’ve seen dramatic changes in the funding environment for startups. This problem afflicts not just every era, but in many ways pushes you in the jaw, but investors too. Periods and commas are constituents if they occur more than 10 times and. Startup School in 2007. Maybe the only answer is a simple answer to the second. The probability that any group will succeed really big. The whole idea of version numbers was quietly dropped. As the volume of startups increases, big companies will start to get it on better terms, which will switch from when one graduates from college to cubicle, and stay there. 055427782 examples 0. The problem with this article is not to drown. This is not one of those rare people who have them happier.

One is that people will post their copyrighted material on YouTube. It has an interactive toplevel, and I got in reply what was then the richest and most sophisticated city in the world, people don’t start things till they’re sure what they want. No one had to force oneself to work on ideas that few beside them realize are good. Then dumb threads would grow slower. Investors were excited about the idea of starting a startup stays alive in everyone’s brain. Live in the future to say this is one of the angels in his Baptism of Christ. There are just two classes: a warrior aristocracy, and the VCs want it to be, but more mundane technologies like light bulbs or semiconductors have to be determined, but flexible as well. For example, people who propose new checks almost never consider that the check itself has a cost. It’s like stretching. Whoever controls the device sets the terms. To make money the way it ultimately will.

I don’t know if this works it will deprive all the programmers have to do is turn off the filters that usually prevent you from seeing them. We’ll waste our time trying to eliminate fragmentation, when we’d be better off if they let their startup do the work. So if you have no ideas. Yeah, that is. Instead of trading violins directly for potatoes, you trade decreased financial risk for increased risk that your company won’t succeed as a startup founder can tell you the most common recipe but not the co-founder who can. Fortuna! If you’re talking to investors, because the broader your holdings, the more informally experts speak. Some who read this essay will say that I’m clueless or being misleading by focusing so much on motivation, the paradoxical result is that scientists tend to make them take off, and you get paid accordingly, but you had no users, it would be hard for anyone to see.

Thanks to Richard Florida, Greg Mcadoo, Robert Morris, Pete Koomen, Lisa Randall, Ron Conway, and Sam Altman for sharing their expertise on this topic.

SOX Record Signals Chip Stocks Have Come Too Far Too Fast
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Semiconductor stocks may struggle to extend gains that sent a benchmark index to a record, according to Jonathan Krinsky, chief market technician at Bay Crest Partners LLC. He cited the gap between the industry gauge – the Philadelphia Semiconductor Index, known by its ticker SOX – and its 50-day moving average in a report Wednesday. The ratio between them ended the day at its highest level since June 2009, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Shares of chipmakers are “starting to get quite extended,” Krinsky wrote.

Qualcomm enlists Samsung, UMC to help meet 28nm Snapdragon S4 demand
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Qualcomm’s Snapdragon S4 chipset is certainly hot (well, not too hot), but it looks like demand is expected to grow even further, causing the San Diego-based SoC maker to turn to allies in the east to help beef up supply. According to China Economic News Service, United Microelectronics Corp. (UMC) and Korea-based Samsung will join Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC) to manufacturer the 28nm chips beginning later this year, in an attempt to increase S4 availability ahead of the Windows RT launch. The article cites Qualcomm CEO Paul Jacobs as saying that a shortage is expected to continue, due to the complicated techniques necessary to manufacturer 28nm chips, and that the company may consider adding its own manufacturing plant in the future. All in all, it doesn’t seem like a terrible position for QCOM to be in. Full details are at the Taiwanese source link below.

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Micron scoops up Elpida Memory, 50-percent production boost for $2.5 billion
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There’s no question that Micron has shifted its focus away from PCs in favor of producing components, shipping everything from SSDs to CMOS sensors in recent years, but the semiconductor manufacturer just took a $2.5 billion step even closer to bridging its gap between other companies in the same market, including Samsung, the chip producer’s top competitor. Under the deal, Elpida Memory, which is headquartered in Tokyo, will fall within the Idaho-based conglomerate’s growing umbrella, netting Micron a 50-percent boost in production capability. That increase did come at great expense, however – the transaction included $750 million in cash and $1.75 billion in future installments (1,750 easy payments of one million dollars?), which are set to continue through 2019. The acquisition was also paired with a 24-percent stake in Rexchip Electronics for an additional $334 million, which will complement Elpida’s investment, yielding a total 89-percent stake for Micron. While the amount does seem quite significant, investors appear to be on board, with Micron’s stock ($MU) currently up more than 4 percent since this morning. Both deals will reportedly close within the next year.

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Metamaterials used to focus Terahertz lasers, make them useful

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Forget old and busted X-rays, T-rays are the future, man! It was only recently that we were discussing Terahertz lasers and their potential to see through paper, clothes, plastic, flesh, and other materials, but that discourse had to end on the sad note that nobody had managed to make them usable in a practical and economically feasible way. The major hurdle to overcome was the diffusion of Terahertz radiation – which results in weak, unfocused lasers – but now researchers from the universities of Harvard and Leeds seem to believe they’ve managed to do it. Using metamaterials to collimate T-rays into a “tightly bound, high powered beam” will, they claim, permit semiconductor lasers (i.e. the affordable kind) to perform the duties currently set aside for sophisticated machinery costing upwards of $160,000. Harvard has already filed a patent application for this innovation, and if things pan out, we might be seeing body scanners (both for medical and security purposes), manufacturing quality checks, and a bunch of other things using the extra special THz stuff to do their work. Read more
TSMC begins construction of new $9.3b foundry, wants to sate our constant hunger for chips

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TSMC might not necessarily be a household name, but the product of its labors tends to be all over home electronics. Aiming to keep that trend going, the Taiwanese chipmaker has just broken ground on its third 300mm wafer plant, located in Taichung’s Central Taiwan Science Park. The new Fab 15 will have a capacity of over 100,000 wafers per month – earning it the prestige of being described as a Gigafab – and once operational it’ll create 8,000 new skilled jobs in the area. Semiconductors built there will also be suitably modern, with 40nm and 28nm production facilities being installed, and lest you worry about such trivial things as the environment, TSMC says it’s doing a few things to minimize the foundry’s energy usage and greenhouse gas emission. Then again, if you’re going to spend nearly $10 billion on something, would you expect anything less? Read more
First molybdenite IC delivers silicon-crushing, chip-shrinking, graphene-blasting action

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Never heard of molybdenite? We’re not shocked. Its not nearly as hyped as graphene or quantum dots, but it could be the key to smaller, bendable microchips. The problem with silicon is that, in layers less than two nanometers thick, it can become unstable, oxidize and quickly deteriorate. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), on the other hand, can be laid down in sheets just three atoms thick. The semiconductor also earns bonus points for being an abundant, naturally occurring mineral. Earlier this year researchers at the Laboratory of Nanoscale Electronics and Structures (LANES) demoed the first molybdenite transistor, but the team is moving fast and has already whipped up the first prototype of a complete integrated circuit (we assume with the aid of an all girl army of Kung Fu engineers). Things are looking good for this potential silicon usurper. And best of all, molybdenite is flexible. So, hello bendable computers! Read more
Apple now the largest buyer of semiconductors according to Gartner

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No one would be shocked to learn that Apple is a major purchaser of semiconductors. Heck, hearing that the company is number one on that list might not even raise too many eyebrows. But, what if you we told you last year the Cupertino crew wasn’t the biggest purchaser, or even the second. In 2010 the House that Jobs Built was a distant third behind Samsung and HP but, following a significant surge thanks to the iPad 2 and the updated MacBook Air, its bumped those companies back a slot. In 2011 Apple increased its semiconductor spending by 34.6 percent, from $12.8 billion to $17.3 billion. Samsung stayed in the number two spot with a 9.2 percent jump in spending to $16.68 billion. Meanwhile HP dropped from first, spending only $16.62 billion and settling for the bronze. Check out the source link for the complete rankings from Gartner. Read more
Texas Instruments wraps up purchase of National Semiconductor
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In April, Texas Instruments announced its intention to snatch up National Semiconductor for a cool $6.5 billion. Now, almost six months later, the acquisition is complete and TI can tack another few percentage points on to its already market-leading chunk of the analog chip market. At least for now, National will operate as a branch of TI’s analog division, which now accounts for over 50-percent of the company’s revenue, and keep its (reasonably) well known brand name alive. For a few more details on the deal, check out the PR after the break. Read more
ARM and TSMC team up for tinier 20nm Cortex SOCs
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It’s no secret that ARM ideas are powering much of the mobile revolution these days, but the company doesn’t print its own systems-on-a-chip, that duty gets outsourced to silicon foundries – like TSMC, who just got all buddy-buddy with the firm to transition future smartphone chips to the 28nm and obscenely tiny 20nm high-k metal gate processes. (We’re not sure what this means for GlobalFoundries, who had a similar deal earlier this year.) As per usual with a die size reduction, ARM chips will see higher speed and have decreased power consumption, but since 20nm is (relatively) unexplored territory it could be years before chips hit the market. PR after the break, or hit the more coverage link for further explanation by an ARM VP of Marketing. Read more
Intel to buy 15 percent of silicon fab equipment maker ASML, wants manufacturing machines made faster
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Chipzilla didn’t get its position as the king of semiconductors by twiddling its thumbs, folks. It became a Valley behemoth by delivering us faster and better silicon, and its latest $4.1 billion purchase – a 15 percent stake in silicon manufacturing equipment maker ASML Holding NV – should help keep Intel atop the CPU heap. You see, Intel’s in the process of retooling its chip manufacturing process to use bigger diameter silicon wafers, which’ll make those Ivy Bridge, ValleyView and other future chips cheaper for all of us. Such retooling can take years to implement, which is likely why Intel was willing to plunk down so much cash to ensure nothing futzes with its manufacturing timetable. The company’s investment will presumably give it the clout to get ASML’s crucial lithography equipment on the fast track to completion. Hop to it, fellas, we want our CPUs at bargain-basement prices, and we want them now.

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Researchers use lasers to supercool semiconductor membranes, blow your mind

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Ah, lasers. Those wonderful, super intense beams of light that we’ve seen used in headlights, projectors, and naturally, death rays. Like us, researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen figure there’s nothing lasers can’t do, and have figured out a way to use them to cool a bit of semiconducting material. This bit of black magic works using a membrane made of gallium arsenide and is based upon principles of quantum physics and optomechanics (the interaction between light and mechanical motion).

Turns out, when a one millimeter square membrane of gallium arsenide is placed parallel to a mirror in a vacuum chamber and bombarded with a laser beam, an optical resonator is created between them that oscillates the membrane. As the distance between the gallium arsenide and the mirror changes, so do the membrane’s oscillations. And, at a certain frequency, the membrane is cooled to minus 269 degrees Celsius – despite the fact that the membrane itself is being heated by the laser. So, lasers can both heat things up and cool them down simultaneously, and if that confuses you as much as it does us, feel free to dig into the science behind this paradoxical bit of research at the source below. In other news, left is right, up is down, and Eli Manning is a beloved folk hero to all Bostonians. Read more
IBM and 3M join forces to fab 3D microchips, create mini-silicon skyscraper valley

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3D hype is fast wearing out its welcome, but there’s at least one area of industry where the buzzed about term could usher in true innovation. Announced today as a joint research project, IBM and 3M will work towards the creation of a new breed of microprocessors. Unlike similar three-dimensional semiconductor efforts by Intel, the two newly partnered outfits plan to stack up to 100 layers of chips atop one another resulting in a microchip “brick.” Under the agreement, IBM will contribute its expertise on packaging the new processors, while 3M will get to work developing an adhesive that can not only be applied in batches, but’ll also allow for heat transfer without crippling logic circuitry. If the companies’ boasts are to be believed, these powerhouse computing towers would cram memory and networking into a “computer chip 1,000 times faster than today’s fastest microprocessor enabling more powerful smartphones, tablets, computers and gaming devices.” That’s a heady claim for a tech that doesn’t yet exist, but is already taking swings at current faux 3D transistors. Official presser and video await you after the break. Read more
Apple's A6 processor may come courtesy of TSMC, Samsung left to wonder why

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Apple’s fondness for anorexic handhelds knows no bounds, and if this alleged deal with the Asian foundry holds water, expect to see its waistband tighten further. Rumoured back before the iPad 2 launch, the house-that-Steve-built’s reportedly been eyeing Taiwanese Semiconductor Manufacturing Corp to produce an ‘A6’ for its upcoming iPhone refresh. While it’s easy to dismiss this purported move as a direct diss to Samsung, what’s more likely is that Cupertino’s engaging in a competitive bit of size does matter – specifically, the A5’s 45nm process. A transition to newer, lower power 28nm ARM chips would give Jonathan Ives’ employer a distinct market advantage, dwarfing even TSMC’s current 40nm in the process. While it’s all still just speculation for now, only time and an iPhone 5 tear-down will tell for sure. Read more
IBM creates consistent electron spin inside semiconductors, takes spintronics one twirl closer
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A fundamental challenge of developing spintronics, or computing where the rotation of electrons carries instructions and other data rather than the charge, has been getting the electrons to spin for long enough to shuttle data to its destination in the first place. IBM and ETH Zurich claim to be the first achieving that feat by getting the electrons to dance to the same tune. Basing a semiconductor material on gallium arsenide and bringing the temperature to an extremely low -387F, the research duo have created a persistent spin helix that keeps the spin going for the 1.1 nanoseconds it would take a normal 1GHz processor to run through its full cycle, or 30 times longer than before. As impressive as it can be to stretch atomic physics that far, just remember that the theory is some distance from practice: unless you’re really keen on running a computer at temperatures just a few hops away from absolute zero, there’s work to be done on producing transistors (let alone processors) that safely run in the climate of the family den. Assuming that’s within the realm of possibility, though, we could eventually see computers that wring much more performance per watt out of one of the most basic elements of nature.

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Fujitsu to merge LSI chip business with Panasonic, cut 5,000 jobs
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Intense semiconductor competition has already forced numerous Japanese companies to work together, and now Fujitsu has announced that it’ll merge its LSI chip design and R&D divisions with Panasonic. The two companies are looking to the state-run Development Bank of Japan to fund the new venture, which comes in the wake of expected Fujitsu losses of over $1 billion this year – forcing the company to cut 5,000 jobs and transfer 4,500 to other divisions by March 31st. Fujitsu said it’s also looking to transfer a state-of-the-art LSI fabrication line in central Japan to a new foundry venture with Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing, the world’s largest chip maker. That carries on a trend in declining Japanese chip dominance, exemplified by Elpida’s bankruptcy and the recent government bailout of Renesas, which itself is a merger of NEC, Hitachi and Mitsubishi’s semiconductor operations.

[Image credits: Wikimedia commons]

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Researchers make unsuitable parts work as solar cells, could lead to cheaper panels
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Harnessing the power of the sun is a tricky business, but even the past few weeks have seen some interesting developments in the field. In this latest installment, researchers from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California have figured out a way of making solar cells from any semiconductor, potentially reducing the cost of their production. You see, efficient solar cells require semiconductors to be chemically modified for the current they produce to flow in one direction. The process uses expensive materials and only works with a few types of semiconductors, but the team’s looking at using ones which aren’t normally suitable – the magic is to apply an electrical field to them. This field requires energy, but what’s consumed is said to be a tiny fraction of what the cell’s capable of producing when active, and it means chemical modification isn’t needed.

The concept of using a field to standardize the flow of juice isn’t a new one, but the team’s work on the geometrical structure of the cells has made it a reality, with a couple of working prototypes to satisfy the skeptics. More of these are on the way, as their focus has shifted to which semiconductors can offer the best efficiency at the lowest cost. And when the researchers have answered that question, there’s nothing left to do but get cracking on commercial production. For the full scientific explanation, hit up the links below.

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