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1年間ピンクにっちゃんが見れるの?!なんていいんだ!可愛すぎる! 成人式終わったら毛先この色にしようかな、めっちゃ可愛い

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the reading “Dangerously Ever After” (about a and her !) (It was raining so we had to read inside for the sake of the dear book!)










“The most glamorous Wendy House ever.” Princess Beatrice Title: PRINCESS ELIZABETH AND PRINCESS MARGARET UNKNOWN Genre: Documentary, portrait Date: 1933 Location: Windsor, UK 🇬🇧







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If Diana hadn't died, had married Dodi Fayed, converted to Islam, had kids: what effect would that have had on the House of Windsor? This is an alternate history of the Royal Family




this is what happens when u haven’t done a day of manual labor in ur life and U shovel for the first time ####



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Color Tutorial

An anon asked about how I do color so I guess these are the basics? might go more into shading and and other stuff later but idk 

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color terminology 

the color wheel aka the rainbow, primary colors (red blue and yellow), secondary colors (orange, green, and purple/violet), tertiary colors(red-violet, red-orange, golden yellow, yellow-green, blue-green/aqua, indigo/blue-purple/violet)the term tertiary isn’t used a lot tbh, Neutrals (black, white, and gray, i also consider brown a neutral but its technically a type of orange). Hue(the straight up color ex; red and green are different hues), tint (adding white to a color ex; pink is technically a tint of red), Tone(adding gray to a color), Shade (adding black to a color). Saturation refers to the amount of color included while value refers to the amount of white/gray/black(or lightness and darkness). Saturation is SUPER IMPORTANT for creating color schemes, having too many highly saturated colors in a color scheme can result in eye strain and not direct the audience as well as you could.

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Complementary; two hues opposite to each other on the color wheel. Analogous; (usually three) hues next to each other on the color wheel. Triadic; three hues equal distant apart on the color wheel(like a triangle). Split Complementary; a hue and two colors on either side of its complementary(like a “Y” shape). There is also a quadratic, which is a square or rectangle shape but I didn’t show that one.

OK NOW LETS COLOR SOME CUTE PRINCESSES

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When making a palette, chose your base hues, but then play with the different variations you can make from those by adding white/gray/black. Often a good way to create distinction between two areas of your piece is to use a complementary as it is balanced between warm and cool colors. Analogous palettes are hard for me to do really well, i usually like to have a neutral or a contrasting color in there. However! one way to create contrast in analogous palettes is to play with values. A light crown in dark hair draws the eye more than the gray crown in the dusty orange hair. If your piece feels off balance, try putting small, darker, details in the lighter areas, it creates a heaviness and more contrast to fill up space.

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Triadic palettes (especially anything close to the primary colors) are often very childlike and happy looking. it also balances the piece really easily, providing enough difference around the whole space that the eye can move around the canvas easily. Split complementary are my personal favorite. Often, your main hue dominates your piece, with the complementary splits providing accents or even being used as a neutral or drawing the eye to a specific place. Here the dominate color is blue, then yellow, then orange in the skin and just barely on the bird. 

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Sometimes my own color palettes don’t work, and I pull from already made ones instead. Usually I can just apply these to the outfit or background while leaving the hair and skin whatever color the character needs. Sometimes I tweak the color palette to better suit my tastes/needs for the piece. Pre-made color schemes are helpful but sometimes lack contrast so I’ll also throw black or white into the mix as well.

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Often I need to have a specific color in my piece, sometimes in a specific spot. In this case its a bright aqua-green bodice. So I put it into complementary, analogous, split complementary, and triadic color palettes, and decided I liked analogous best(though it is a rather wide analogous). Now that I have my two other hues, I play with the saturation and value for them. I leave the orange super saturated on the gems and the bird to draw attention to them, but toned it down for her skin and hair. When doing a piece with a background its a good idea to stick with your original color palette as it provides a harmonious over all appearance, BUT if you want your character to stand out make sure you use either lighter/darker or warmer/cooler colors compared to your figure. Make the background super different if you want the character to fight against it or look out of place. An easy way to BS perspective is to push the cooler colors(blue primarily) to the back and pull the yellows and oranges out more in the Foreground(this mimic atmospheric perspective). I again used the orange and an attention grabber in the flowers to pull the viewers eyes to the foreground and therefore to the princess. 

Hopefully this is helpful????? 

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Tenebrasco

  • Author: Hannah Reed
  • Genre: YA Fantasy
  • Rating: 4 Stars


April, a mermaid (mer) Princess, tries to navigate life with new friends, her powers going haywire, and the peace treaty between humans and mer ruined before it’s even signed.

The world building in this novel is phenomenal and the magic system is simple and consistent. The characters were also well developed. However, the P.O.V sometimes changed too abruptly, which was a bit disorienting.

Overall, the book was incredibly enthralling and I highly anticipate the next instalment of the series