Posts on Twitter:

Thanks to all 30 participants today for their participation for a ! They picked: ๐Ÿฅค6,5kg ๐Ÿ—ž7,5kg ๐Ÿพ1,5kg ๐Ÿ8,5kg ๐Ÿšฌ1kg โš ๏ธ๐—ง๐—ผ๐˜๐—ฎ๐—น: 25kgโ™ป๏ธ๐Ÿ’ช๐Ÿผ







In this graphic there are 14 points highlighted where plays a role in modern homes! Can you name what they are? What other places can you find plastics in your home? Check out the graphic:




Hemp are a better solution...They biodegrade within roughly 45 days of production. Better for the and everything in it... is killing ALL ...This is just plain murder...I'm sickened by those who still will not believe there is a













ยซย Plastique - le combat est il perdu ?ย ยป - 1ere tribune et du โ™ป๏ธ dans . โžก๏ธ Candidatez pour le Prix de 100.000 Euros jusquโ€™au 31 octobre sur !




Grร cies als 30 participants dโ€™avui per la seva contribuciรณ a una ! Sโ€™han recollit: ๐Ÿฅค6,5kg de ๐Ÿ—ž7,5kg de /cartrรณ ๐Ÿพ1,5kg de ๐Ÿ8,5kg de ๐Ÿšฌ1kg de de cigars โš ๏ธ๐—ง๐—ผ๐˜๐—ฎ๐—น: 25kgโ™ป๏ธ๐Ÿ’ช๐Ÿผ



Retweet Retweeted Like Liked

Extreme concentrations of have been found in the North Atlantic's Sargasso Sea. Learn more about microplastics in the Sargasso Sea and their potential implications:




Check out our โ€œFilms on Pipesโ€ page which features a variety of interesting and useful plastic pipe videos. Send me some info about your video and we will post it also.




Some pictures of our factory. Using the best machinery possible โœ… Providing the highest quality service to clientsโœ… Take a look at some more photos and a more detailed look at what we do:




But aside from its health benefits, can also be used to solve the serious issue of pollution. How? By acting as a natural alternative to .










Disposable Plastic cutleries Now Hot sale!!! From Spoons, knives, forks etc. For a whole catalogue of disposables: Email:customercare@sangyug.com Call:๐Ÿ“ฒ0715177456๐Ÿ“ฒ0792746183.




youโ€™ve got to appreciate โ€™s caustic marketing efforts.




Nature has long reached its saturation point and can't take any more of the we have been feeding it for ages. Well, the don't know the difference but we do. Reduce the plastic usage and resort to reusable goods to save the choking









Posts on Tumblr:

Gob hoard
image

Random plastic shit:

  • Beads
  • Weird ball thing i found in the dirt
  • Fishy puzzle eraser
  • Sting ray
  • Blocks of some sort?
  • Chicken
image

Metal stuff

  • Metal key
  • Washer??? Found it in the parking lot of wallmart
  • COIN
image

Organic stuff

  • Wasp nest
  • TWO knots from trees
  • like 4 acorns
  • Feather
  • Cicada shell
image

ROCKS

All sorts of fucking rocks

cnn.com
Microplastics discovered in 'extreme' concentrations in the North Atlantic
By Arwa Damon and Brice Laine, CNN

Within the Atlantic Ocean is the world’s only sea without shores, its borders defined by the currents of the North Atlantic gyre. The Sargasso Sea takes its name from sargassum, a free-floating golden brown seaweed that is a haven for hatchling sea turtles and hundreds of other marine species who use it to feed, grow and hide from predators. But the sargassum is now home to objects wholly unnatural too.

Caught up in the swirling gyre is a growing collection of human waste: trash from countries that border the Atlantic, from the west coast of Africa to the east coast of the US, slowly breaking up on its long journey into microplastics that end up in the gills and stomachs of aquatic animals…

“This goes into the food chain.” Ojeda explains. “The fish and shrimps eat the plastic, we are eating them or the fish that eat them, and this will end up in our bodies somehow…”

A study from June 2019 said the average person ingests around 2,000 microplastic particles a week – around five grams, or the weight of a credit card. What scientists don’t yet fully understand is what that plastic or the toxins that plastic contains can do to us.

Based on the limited evidence available, chemicals and microbial pathogens associated with microplastics in drinking water pose a low concern for human health. Although there is insufficient information to draw firm conclusions on the toxicity of nanoparticles, no reliable information suggests it is a concern.
—  A passage from a World Health Organization report that finds that microplastics—think the tiny beads used in facial scrubs or toothpastes—may not be as dangerous as originally thought. Such plastics have been a cause for concern in recent years. However, we’re not out of the woods yet—WHO emphasizes that more research is needed—but the organization says the energy spent worrying about microplastics in drinking water would be better spent focusing on removing bacteria and viruses from water.
theguardian.com
Amazon under fire for new packaging that cannot be recycled
Use of plastic envelopes branded a ‘major step backwards’ in fight against pollution
By Miles Brignall

Amazon has been criticised by environmental groups and customers after introducing a range of plastic packaging that cannot be recycled in the UK.

While supermarkets and other retailers have been reducing their use of single use plastics, the world’s biggest online retailer has started sending small items in plastic envelopes, seemingly to allow more parcels to be loaded on to each delivery truck.

Adrian Fletcher, an Amazon customer from Glasgow, is among a number who have complained to the company. He said the move felt like a “major step backwards” in the fight against plastic.

“My husband is disabled, and we rely a lot on Amazon and other home deliveries. Previously our small orders arrived in easily recyclable cardboard packaging, but a few months ago Amazon started using plastic envelopes. I diligently recycle all the packaging but can’t these,” he said.

“The supermarkets have all been dropping carrier bags from their online deliveries, but Amazon is going the other way – it’s madness. I have asked them not to ship my orders using plastic packaging but this falls on deaf ears.”

Amazon’s Second Chance website, which details how customers should recycle its packaging, states the Prime-branded envelopes are “not widely recycled across the UK”.

It is thought that Amazon ships between 4bn and 5bn parcels a year worldwide. In February, the Washington Post reported on how the new Amazon envelopes were clogging up US recycling centres as consumers were wrongly placing them in recycling bins.

On Monday, Amazon was among 181 companies that signed up to a new official definition of corporate purpose in the US, which threw out the decades-old sole objective of making as much profit for shareholders as possible to embrace the interests of other stakeholders, including employees, customers, suppliers and the community.

The move, seen as a response to increasing criticism of business and traditional capitalism, included a pledge to protect the environment “by embracing sustainable practices”. It was signed by Jeff Bezos, the Amazon founder and boss.

Mike Childs, the head of policy at Friends of the Earth, said: “Despite the huge public outcry, it’s astonishing how many companies are still using single-trip, unrecyclable plastic for deliveries.

Read More

ask-the-plastics  asked:

Yeah, Regina's not always the nicest, but when she's not, it's just because she's trying to help me. OHMYGOD DON'T TELL HER I SAID THAT. What's the Clique series about??? -Karen

I won’t tell her, dear. Don’t worry.

I’m not sure, so you may have to look them up, but I believe they’re about a group of girls in middle school. That’s all I know, I’m afraid

ask-the-plastics  asked:

Do you have any books I might like then? Because I think I'd like to try, even if Regina says I shouldn't because I'm too dumb. I think you might be right. -Karen

It’s not very nice of her to say that about you.

I have heard of the Clique series. They might be up your alley.

ask-the-plastics  asked:

I think so too, especially since I'm not smart? I probably would have been hit by a bus by now or something without her. -Karen

She sounds like a very good friend then. I am sure @crowley-demon-official has stopped me from being hit by a vehicle when I’m crossing the road. He always complains that I don’t pay enough attention…

Environment

Plastic Pollution goes Airborne

Tiny bits of microplastics have been discovered in recent months in rainwater and snowfall from Colorado to the Arctic.

They join similar plastic pollution that has shown up in groundwater, rivers and lakes, and at the deepest depths of the sea.

Scientists from the Northwest Passage Project, taking ice core samples this summer in Arctic Canada, say they also found visible plastic beads and filaments of various shapes and sizes in the ice.

Earlier studies have found that plastic has fallen from the sky in Europe’s Pyrenees Mountains, a region near Hong Kong, the Iranian capital of Tehran and Paris.

External image

This is the best thing I’ve ever seen!

Source: Rami Malek Best Actor facebook group

3

It’s raining plastic: microscopic fibers fall from the sky in Rocky Mountains | US news | The Guardian

Plastic was the furthest thing from Gregory Wetherbee’s mind when he began analyzing rainwater samples collected from the Rocky Mountains. “I guess I expected to see mostly soil and mineral particles,” said the US Geological Survey researcher. Instead, he found multicolored microscopic plastic fibers.

The discovery, published in a recent study (pdf) titled “It is raining plastic”, raises new questions about the amount of plastic waste permeating the air, water, and soil virtually everywhere on Earth.

“I think the most important result that we can share with the American public is that there’s more plastic out there than meets the eye,” said Wetherbee. “It’s in the rain, it’s in the snow. It’s a part of our environment now.”

Rainwater samples collected across Colorado and analyzed under a microscope contained a rainbow of plastic fibers, as well as beads and shards. The findings shocked Wetherbee, who had been collecting the samples in order to study nitrogen pollution. 

forbes.com
Irish Teen Wins 2019 Google Science Fair For Removing Microplastics From Water
Fionn Ferreira, an 18-year-old from West Cork, Ireland won the competition for his methodology to remove microplastics from water.
By Trevor Nace