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Luisia teres × Vanda falcata




Blue orchids with pink roses in a wooden handle basket, beautifully decorated and ribbon makes one of the best choice to deliver someone on special occasions Visit:






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Working on in Southeast Asia? Going to the and want to spend more time in ? Apply for the Workshop on to be held at March 3rd-7th! Find out more and apply here:




pals, as you may know I’ve started the journey of raising this that a new or forming??? I have four new and one with two new looking for good news!



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The bud has become a bloom! Laelia (Cattleya) alaorii, small species native to Brazil. Considered the warmest growing of the Section Hadrolaelia, native habitat of lowland forests.



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I’ve been in love with orchids for quite a long time! Here I am in Oaxaca, México in 1987 checking out citrina growing in the wild. Bonus I’m also wearing a awesome cap with a logo. While visiting Ed and Mary Greenwood Of the Mexican Society.



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August 20th of the day: Cattleya Gaudii forma coerulea, "a primary hybrid of Cattleya tigrina x Cattleya loddigesii. 15 flowers on this one stem and the flowers have the scent of bubblegum." Comment and photo by Ed Merkle.



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Maxillaria variegated

Yesterday I received two orchids I bought. Both were replacement orchids. One was the Cattleya Nutley. I bought that one because the one I had was on a doomed path and I wanted to have another one just in case the first one died. The other replacement orchid is a Maxillaria Tenuifolia. It’s not that the one I have is about to be no more but the poor orchid is weak and I don’t expect her to recover fully for at least two years (maybe I’m being too pessimistic?). Anyway. I was going to buy a Maxillaria but… the store had a Maxillaria variegated! That wasn’t reason enough to feature this orchid in a entry just for her. It’s just that… well, take a look.

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The variegation is not on the leaves but on the pseudobulbs. Yeah, they’re not rotting, they simply have that colouring pattern. Let’s take a closer look.

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Yeah, it really looks like the pseudobulb is yellowing because there’s something wrong with it, but that’s not the case. The media is all covered in a layer of moss. Hmmm… that might alter my repotting plans… Anyway, I wanted to show the difference between this maxillaria and the other one I have.

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One might say “yeah, one is bigger than the other, but one is recovering from losing all of her roots and everything”. I agree but the older pseudobulbs of my small maxillaria are smaller than the variegated ones. Those old pseudobulbs didn’t suffer any shock, so I think I can say they’re normal size. Also, the length of the leaves.

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My small maxillaria has looooong leaves (well, leaf at the moment, the rest are still growing) while the variegated has shorter leaves. Well, I guess we’ll see in the future if they’re exactly the same (minus the variegation) or if they’re different.

I’m going to use the “maxillaria tenuifolia variegated” tag for this one and the “maxillaria tenuifolia” tag for the other. I’ll also list them apart in the List of my orchids link under the header.

etsy.com
Oncidium Twinkle Orchid Fine Art Photo Print
Size: 5x7, 8x10, 11x14 Medium: Digital Photography Framed: No All prints are printed on high quality archival photo paper. For larger sizes (11x14 or poster sizes), specialty papers (canvas, high gloss), or framing - feel free to submit a custom order or send me a personal message for pricing.

Floor and walls of the same tone make a small box of a room feel bigger. Sisal covers the entire floor in a warm tan, similar to that of the furniture. One liberty taken with the monochromatic theme is turquoise upholstery set off by a man-made zebra rug of jungle stripes.

House Beautiful: Decorating Style, 1992

“Just in case” orchids

Let’s start with the bad news. My Cattlianthe Kiwi senior has passed away. I tried to remove the sick sections of the plant but the infection kept spreading until the whole orchid was sick. Some time ago I feared this would happen so I bought another Cattlianthe Kiwi (cattlianthe kiwi junior I called her). Fortunately this one is faring better. Her new growth is starting to form leaves and as far as I know she has one root but there could be more. Anyway, I’m saying all this because I have two orchids that don’t look too good and I thought that I really want to have them so, just like I did with the Cattlianthe Kiwi, I should buy a replacement should something happen to them. Let’s see which orchids I’m talking about:

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Funnily enough, when I bought my Cattlianthe Kiwi replacement, I also bought a cattleya seedling, the Cattleya Nutley. Things were fine for this orchid for a while. Whereas the new Cattlianthe lost all of her roots, the Nutley retained a few. She had a new growth and a few nubbins. Things couldn’t be better. But they could be worse and after a while, the sheath covering the new growth turned black. Then both eyes at the base of that new growth turned black. Then the new growth started to wobble so I removed it and I discovered some rotting or some infection going on at the base. Then the two nubbins nearby started to turn black. Well, one has turned black, so I removed it, the other… I’m still hoping it will survive but it doesn’t look good.

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The only nubbin left is somewhere at the base of the pseoduobulb on the left. So unless some old eyes react and start swelling up, I fear this orchid won’t reach adult status ever. That’s why I decided to get another Cattleya Nutley and I hope that either the new one or this one will make it. The other orchid I wanted to buy a replacement for is not in good shape but things aren’t as hopeless as with the C. Nutley. I’m talking about my maxillaria tenuifolia.

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This one is a fighter and I don’t plan to give up on her but I also would like to see her in bloom while I’m still young and have my eyesight. This poor orchid was initially a healthy and bushy plant but the seller thought it would be a great idea to dump her in a bucket of water juuuuust before shipping her to me. As a result, more than half the orchid rotted and I could only save two pseudobulbs. Then, I made a terrible newbie mistake and removed the sheaths containing the new roots. Later I discovered that those sheaths are there to protect the new roots in their journey down to the media and keep them hydrated. Despite all that, the orchid is not only still alive but she grew a tiny pseudobulb (the one in the middle) that’s currently growing two new growths. Still. Things could turn for the worse at any moment (the orchid has been stagnant for a while) so I thought I could get another maxillaria and pot her together with this one.

The orchids arrived today.

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This is the new Cattleya Nutley. And… things are not promising. (Maybe I’m not a ray of sunshine and I’m too pessimistic?) The orchid is floppy but I think it is because it’s very dehydrated. The media is loose (only a few stubborn pieces remained attached to the roots) and that must be why everything dried faster than usual during transport.

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Nice root system after a good soak. Only a few dead roots and I think those were long gone, so they didn’t die because of transport. After removing the old sheaths I can see two eyes that could develop into new growths.

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There she is. If she looks perky is because I had to tie the orchid to that stick you can see. No matter. I think she will recover from transport in no time.

The other orchid I bought is a Maxillaria, as I said before. Still… I think this new orchid deserves her own entry so, tune in tomorrow! Same place!

If you want to know more about these orchids, please check the tags and the List of my orchids link under the header.

Ah! Since the Cattleya Nutley seedling is a replacement orchid, everything regarding this one and my other Cattleya Nutley will be under the same tag.

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Speaking of very small things in very large vivariums, one of my micro orchids in the leucomelas tank is blooming. It’s circled (and arrowed!) in the upper left of the full tank image… lol. emphasis on ‘micro,” I guess

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Orchid, Sigmatostalix eliae by Andreas Kay
Via Flickr:
from Ecuador: www.youtube.com/AndreasKay