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Tyr's Tuesday is now up and this week we are Fortunate enjoy x Find it here


















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Reviving some of the designs I used to woodburn and sell in my Etsy shop. These will be in my shop by the end of the day.

























These Curonian viking rings now available in the shop with 20% off! ⁠ Link in BIO.⁠ Photo: .phot0s .⁠ ⁠ .⁠ .⁠ .⁠ …




Viking assigned one of their top warriors to guard my 12-foot Viking Prow sculptures at last week's Viking event in L.A. Such a thrill to see my art this big and to share it with over 300 guests from around the world.







I finally finished my freya drawing..time to sleeb



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Dwarvnir evolved into Dragovnir! It evolved after obtaining its relic. They viciously protect the treasure it hoards



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anonymous asked:

According to Ægil's Saga, women that died in battle would go to Sessrúmnir with Freya, along with half of the slain in battle. It is also believed she might have chosen very skilled artisans as well, but Odin once implies Thor is the one doing so. And apparently, if you were a virgin you would be received by Gefjon Other good afterlife is Helgafell, which might be in Helhein, where good people in general and those fallen in battle but not chosen by Valkyries would go Death here is complicated

//When we talk about the Norse afterlife I usually consult the old literature, the source of it all, mainly the Poetic & Prose Edda. For me, Ægil’s Saga is a bit ‘newer’ than those I mentioned, but suit yourself!

It’s all just mythology. If you believe in it, if you think this is the way, then this is the way. I’ve stated facts from actual, original sources, nothing more. No malicious intent.

Besides, personally, and don’t take this wrong, but I don’t understand why everyone wants to get to Valhalla.

To be precise — according to the original Poetic and Prose Edda —, every dead goes to Hel first, and that is where Freyja chooses the best of the fallen first, then Odin chooses for himself.

Now, if you get to Valhalla, you get good food, good drinks (although there’re so many warriors that it’s a problem, as some passages I mentioned contained this information earlier), but there’s a wonderful task you’ve got to prepare for, every day — Ragnarök. A mighty battle fought by Odin and his einherjar. Against monsters like the Moon-eater Fenrir. And if they die in said battle? They go to Hel.

Mmm, no thanks.

I mean aye, glorious death to die (basically you DIE TWICE), but I wouldn’t want to live for who knows how long, doing nothing but training for the last Big Boss Battle™. Yes, it’d be nice to spend some time with the gods and Valkyries, but if I had a chance to choose, I’d choose Hel.

Why? Because it is said and believed Hel is similar to our world, there we can even be with our loved ones and do what we do even right now. Personally, I’d be so very happy with afterlife if I could spend it with nothing but writing stories.

Not training for the Big Boss Battle™. I’m soft. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Anyway, it’s just my opinion :D!

Looking for Norse Pagan/Witches!!!

Hi there! I’ve been doing some more research on Freyja since having that dream last month and I’ve got quite a few witchy friends I follow on here, but I’m looking to make some more friends that:

  • Follow the Norse Pantheon
  • Are a devotee of a Norse Deity
  • Post about Norse Mythology
  • Are a Norse Witch
  • Post about Runes/Rune casting

DO NOT INTERACT IF YOU ARE A TERF OR NAZI! I WILL NOT ALLOW IT ON MY BLOG!!!

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After having to end almost all of my Christian interfaith friendships for my personal health, I finally understand why it’s so hard to maintain a relationship with Christian friends. 

As a Pagan, I’ve never sought to identify myself or my religious practice by post-Christian angst it’s always been tiresome when I see it in pagan blogs or beginner books. While I don’t think we should define our religious identity by our traumas with a previous one… it never really occurred to me until recently why maintaining friendships with Christians has been so draining.

When Christian friends have said things that were tone deaf or disrespectful of my beliefs, I assumed it was naivety and ignorance. I used to think “what’s one ignorant thing said here or there as long as I have some teachable moments as an opportunity to educate them on my faith?”

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Free Rune Reading Results

Greetings all! Here are the results from yesterday’s reading. I apologize for not having it posted earlier, however I felt compelled to extend it to ensure that as many people could participate as possible. With that said, let’s get on to the reading!

1. For those of you who chose the Pine Needles, your rune is Hagalaz.

Hagalaz says: “You are coming to a period of restriction - be wary not to extend your energies too much. Current difficulties may require major change, but this too will pass. Harship can be endured. Resilience is necessary. You can learn from the current situaion. You are being distracted by drama.”

Hagalaz is a rune from the Elder Futhark, and litterally means “hailstone”. In the north, hailstones could destroy homes and wreck crops, and so were seen as a symbol of hardship. Hagalaz is the herald of old things returning, of things that have not been dealt with. On the bright side, it also signals that once these situations are dealt with, the ice will melt and the sun will shine again - leaving us stronger and more resiliant than before.


“The sting of hardship;

the venom, the famine

of what you expect or

do not want;

the hope destroyer,

the wrecker of crops,

the plague:

But this too shall pass.”


2. For those of you who chose the Pinecone, your rune is Kenaz.

Kenaz says: “The way forward is illumintated. Be the change you wish to see. Don’t just talk - embody your message to the world. No one can know everything, so learn from trusted others or elders. By illuminating our shadows, we understand ourselves and our behaviours more deeply.”

In the days of the Northmen, there were no formal schools. Therefore, skills were passed from one person to another by example over an extended period of time. If you were a boat builder, for instance, you taught others how to build a boat step by step. The teacher would not only show the student how to build the boat, but would hone in on the student’s personal fire and talents, thus making him a more masterful boat builder than even the teacher. Kenaz is both the torch and the fire of kinship. It is the force that shows us the right way forward, and reveals the knowledge we need to be our best. Northmen would often turn to elders, or others who had experience in a process or subject, and seek their cooperation or guideance. Then, those with the knowledge would share it albiet if freely, or through charge. This is a sign that you are on the right track and that the way you seek is open to you, if only you remember to stay humble and ask for help and knowledge when it is needed.


“The way the craftsman

runs his hands over the wood and knows

what is already within it,

As the creation floats to the surface,

lit from within …

The knowledge of both appears,

obvious for those that would see.”


3. For those of you that chose the Acorn, your run is Perthro.

Perthro says: “Search your memory for the answer. You have had experience with this issue before. You will be coming into a period of good luck. Ready yourself to receive luck by preparing a base of hard work. There is more than one way to solve the current problem.”

The Norse were very fond of betting games. These games included tossing dice or stones from a cup, which was both simple entertainment as well as a way for them to pass time between battles. Perthro, which is in the shape of a dice cup, considers the questions about what is down to luck and what is based on will. When dice are thrown, while we think that the outcome is just chance, how we shake the cup and the angle and strength of the toss - all influence the roll of the dice. While some people may choose to sit back, let things take their course and accept that they will get what they get - others choose to influence their future. These people base their choices on their awareness of the gifts fate has given them, and understand that the more you know, the more you know how to achieve. As we consider how to shape our lives, we can choose to push against fate or move with it.


“The dice fall

where they may,

but all is not purely fate.

Will is strong,

and flows through the tree,

and changes the carvings, too.

Great things can happen

when all combine.”


Thank you so much to everyone who participated this week! We will be doing another free reading for everyone next Sunday. Until then, may the gods bless you all!


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Behold! Sif’s Garden: Organic Sencha Green Tea with Organic Strawberries & Organic Calendula:

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🍓🌼🍵

DESCRIPTION AND LORE

Sif is the golden-haired goddess from Norse lore who is well-known not for her own role and powers, but rather for being the wife of Thor and for having her divine hair defiled by Loki. Since we know little else about her, though, I’ve had to take some liberties. Her golden hair is represented in the tea blend by calendula, which is also frequently referred to as marigold. The strawberries, however, represent Sif’s lesser-known relationship with the Earth. As the later sections of the Prose Edda (Skaldskaparmal) suggest, the word “Sif” is listed as being another name for Earth. Furthermore, since Thor is the son of Jörðr (aka the Earth) and has some dominion over the earth’s fertility (according to some, but not all, sources), it seemed appropriate that, if Sif were to have a garden, she would include strawberries, which in Iceland today are called jarðarber, or “earth-berry.” I like to believe that strawberries would remind Sif, who is sometimes hailed as a goddess of family and wedlock (Cleasby/Vigfusson, 526), of how her union with Thor brings her closer to the Earth itself.

Fill your cup with loose leaf or tea bags:

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Deity Communication

Based on the type of communication, gods and goddesses have a signature way they communicate. For example, I have noticed Baldur has swift and small pendulum movements whereas Freya’s is big and Skadi’s is more square like circles. The same can go for tarot or any other type of communication. Like people, deities have different personalities and ways of speaking. One might like visualization and symbols to communicate while another might be super blunt and talk directly. Although deities are gods/goddesses they in their own ways have quirks and are meme like :) Just respect them and do not let them disrespect you. If they do, politely explain why and “breakup”  with them. Perhaps they have a bad day or reaction so give them second chances if you like but do not forget their behavior.

“I have traveled so much,

I have tried so much,

and I have often tested the mighty.

What did Odin whisper

in Balder’s ear,

before he placed him on the pyre?” -Odin


“No one knows

what you said

in those ancient days, in your son’s ear.

I have spoken my aged wisdom,

I have told you of Ragnorak,

I have spoken with a doomed mouth.

Now I know that I wagered

my head against Odin’s in wisdom–

but you, Odin, are forever wisest of all.” - Riddle Weaver

- The Poetic Edda, Vafthruthnismal, Stanza 54-56

anonymous asked:

Got any resource recommendations for Seidr and/or Norse witchcraft (traditional or contemporary is fine)? I'm a secular witch and Norse pagan, meaning that I keep the two more or less separate, but I want to incorporate parts of my Norse religion into my witchcraft practice.

Hallo Nonny, 

The only decent book I can think of is Seidways by Jan Fries. It’s a bit outdated and American-centric but then most books written in English are pretty disconnected from Scandinavia. 

I’d also suggest getting onto Academia.com, Scribd, and JSTOR and start reading theses and papers that focus upon Seiðr, Spae, metaphysical, occult, and “shamanic” practices of the Norse written by scholars. More and more scholars are Pagan themselves or at least appreciate and understand a Pre-Christian worldview that isn’t filtered through a Xian lens.

When I have a minute I’ll put together a post of some of my favorite papers and essays on Seidr. 

Hope this helps in the meantime. Fries’ Seidways should give you a foundation, even if not all of it is perfect.