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led a of and travel writers to last week, which included a three-day stay at Awei Pila on a remote island in the Mergui Archipelago.




A decade ago, I hoped Suu Kyi would one day have her moment in the Hague, stare down her accusers. This is not what I meant.













That’s a wrap on a huge week in for the team and Yangon Children’s Hospital Faculty. Congratulations to our new faculty on delivering an excellent program and a big thanks to senior team Prof Aye Aye, Dr Yin Mar Oo, and




We are delighted to welcome our newest graduates from Victoria University College in to the alumni family 🎓
















The New Light of Myanmar brengt het nieuws dat Aung San Suu Kyi het team leidt dat Myanmar verdedigt tijdens de aanklacht bij het ICJ in Den Haag ook. Pagina 16.




The President of the would surely have given formal notification to of the ad hoc appointment. Any idea as to the time limit for an objection to be entered? Precedent for previous objections to ad hoc appointments?




The State Counselor Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, in her capacity as Union Minister for Foreign Affairs, will defend the national interest of Myanmar at the #🇲🇲




Last week, William Greenlee (DFDL Partner) and Bhawna Bakshi (DFDL Legal Adviser) participated in the ‘ in Myanmar’ seminar organized by Konrad Adenauer Stiftung and the Delegation of German Industry and Commerce in :













Will cases brought against deliver justice to ? "Multiple cases were initiated in the contexts of the atrocities committed in the former and , for example," said , the law professor.

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: FEARS FOR SAFETY OF MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT ABDUCTED BY THE ARAKAN ARMY IN CHIN STATE. Statement by



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theguardian.com
Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi faces first legal action over Rohingya crisis
Case launches in Argentina under ‘universal jurisdiction’ demanding justice over ‘existential threat’ to minority
bbc.com
Will Omar get justice for his murdered family?
"When I wake up every morning I start crying. Then I wipe my tears away and I get ready to go to school," he said.

Sitting on the floor of his makeshift school in the sprawling refugee camp of Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh, 11-year-old Omar spoke softly as he remembered his mother and father.

“My parents loved me so much. They looked after me very well,” he said.

He explained how his parents were murdered by the Myanmar army in August 2017. Three of his brothers and two of his sisters were also killed.

“When I wake up every morning I start crying. Then I wipe my tears away and I get ready to go to school,” he said.

Two years on, it is still hard to process the brutality of what happened to Omar and his fellow Rohingya who had been living in Myanmar - or Burma as it was previously known.

You would be forgiven for assuming such stories would have brought swift and decisive international action. They did not. Visible progress towards any kind of justice for the minority Muslim group has been painfully slow.

But now we’ve seen three legal developments - seemingly unrelated - which some legal experts are calling a big step forward, and which offer a degree of hope to Rohingya campaigners.

Rohingya: Mohammadshofait Kurimullah, 8, still suffers from burn wounds when their house was set on fire in Myanmar. His mother, Yasmin Kurimullah, says she has not seen his father and one of her other sons since August 25. They now live in a refugee camp near the Myanmar border in Bangladesh, Oct. 6, 2017.

Photographer: Cheryl Diaz Meyer, Freelance

2018 Eyes of History: Still Contest: International News

Rohingya: After escaping into Bangladesh, Rohingya refugee Dolohussam Amirkhamza, 60, is carried by his brother Rahamatullah Amirkhamza, left, and neighbor Rahim Mohammedhussein, right, as they journey from the southernmost tip of Bangladesh inland to refugee camps on Oct. 4, 2017.

Photographer: Cheryl Diaz Meyer, Freelance

2018 Eyes of History: Still Contest: International News