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Love these equation building tasks. Great to discuss how each equation is different in context but equal when simplified.




US Teachers, there's still time to sign up for this Thursday's JUMP Math At A Glance, a free 45-minute webinar to learn more about our approach and trio of resources! (Next opportunity, Feb 19)



















Jonathan is a math teacher in California who has been leading the way with digital assessments for years!




Inspired by we cranked up the theme songs & “levelled up” our understanding of addition/multiplication. The consolidation is minutes away and they are pumped to share their strategies.



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Don’t forget about the on “The Impact of Identity in K-8 Mathematics” happening now! ➡️➡️ enter flipcode flipbookstudy001




RT ProEdTN "More teachers are realizing the importance of making practical, relevant connections in math. Check out these 7 Real-World Math Strategies. "







More teachers are realizing the importance of making practical, relevant connections in math. Check out these 7 Real-World Math Strategies.







🚨Gizmo of the Week🚨 Help teach your students the building blocks of algebra with our linear functions ! Start using Gizmos today with your free account.




🚨Gizmo of the Week🚨 Help teach your students the building blocks of algebra with our linear functions ! Start using Gizmos today with your free account.







Our documents focus deeply on the major work of each grade so that students can gain strong foundations to solve problems inside and outside the math classroom.




Do you think too much snow can cause damage? Take a look at this set with your students and find out what heavy snow can do.






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This is called Crazy Towers. A version of Towers of Hanoi with 15 pieces jumbled.

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Pretty amazing #3dthinking here. #origami #geometry #mathchat This kid has mad skills.

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My Opinion on #CCSS-M

I have had the luxury of taking time to form my opinion on the new Common Core Standards.

There are three issues to consider, all of which get discussed when we talk about them.

1. The content of the standards themselves.

2. The nature of the assessments used to hold schools accountable for them.

3. The implementation of them, from curricular support, professional development and accountability processes.

My take on Issue 1 is that they are a strong first draft. The practice standards are the boldest and most important innovation, since they press on higher order thinking. Nonetheless they have some flaws. For instance, a teacher friend told me one grade asks that students learn to make box-and-whiskers plots while the subsequent grade asks for students to compare them to look at differences in measures of central tendency. Well, making those plots without looking comparatively is a silly exercise since the whole point is that they make measures of central tendency and spread visible. Goofs like this could be tweaked in field testing, but the authors did not have that chance.

2. I had some hope that the ‘second generation’ assessments developed for CCSS-M would be a step up from a lot of what we have seen. The release items I have seen so far have not carried out that promise.

3. The biggest problem, in my mind, is the rush of implementation and the lack of resources to make this ambitious goal feasible. Perhaps the most fatal aspect of implementation is that CCSS-M is getting put into the very flawed infrastructure of NCLB/RTTT. On the ground, it ends up feeling like a turning of the screws in the already problematic accountability pressures schools and teachers are facing.