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Form UI design in a nutshell: we gathered 5 principles to boost conversion, along with 5 traps to avoid. Check them out!




Form UI design in a nutshell: we gathered 5 principles to boost conversion, along with 5 traps to avoid. Check them out!









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Form UI design in a nutshell: we gathered 5 principles to boost conversion, along with 5 traps to avoid. Check them out!










Form UI design in a nutshell: we gathered 5 principles to boost conversion, along with 5 traps to avoid. Check them out!







Form UI design in a nutshell: we gathered 5 principles to boost conversion, along with 5 traps to avoid. Check them out!




Form UI design in a nutshell: we gathered 5 principles to boost conversion, along with 5 traps to avoid. Check them out!



















Can't wait to check out the interface. They've done some great work. But when??? Microsoft FCC Filing Hints That the Wait for HoloLens 2 Is Almost Over






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Researcher proposes Thumb on Hand gestures, no touchscreen necessary (video)

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Would you be willing to wear an additional device in order to avoid interacting with another? That’s the conundrum posed to us by Christian Loclair, a master’s student at the Hasso Plattner Institute. His thesis, titled Thumb on Hand Interaction, proposes that users control their mobile equipment with simple hand gestures that are performed independently of their device’s touchscreen. This level of freedom requires that users wear a depth camera on their chest, and builds upon prior research from the Hasso Plattner Institute that required use of both hands. Loclair proposes a diverse new set of gestures that users can perform with only one hand, where one’s thumb acts as the primary navigation tool and one’s palm serves as a trackpad. Another set of gestures is based on the interaction of one’s thumb and index finger, which allows users to control sliders and the like. Perhaps once the research team determines how to implement this technology without making our lives more complex, we’ll be able to sink our teeth into this one. In the meantime, you’ll find a video demonstration after the break. Read more
Multi-robot command center built around Microsoft Surface (video)

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While we’ve given up on ever winning an online match of StarCraft II, that doesn’t mean top-down unit control schemes are only for nerds in their mom’s basement with their cheap rush tactics and Cheeto fingers and obscene triple digit APMs (we’re not bitter or anything). In fact, we kind of like the look of this robot control interface, developed at UMass Lowell by Mark Micire as part of his PhD research. The multitouch UI puts Microsoft Surface to good use, with gestures and contextual commands that make operating an unruly group of robots look easy, and a console-inspired touch control setup for operating a single bot from a first person perspective as well. There are a couple videos after the break, the first is Mike operating an army of virtual robots, using Microsoft Robotics Developer Studio to simulate his soldiers and environment, but the second shows his first person UI guiding a real robot through a maze, in what amounts to a very, very expensive version of that Windows 95 maze screensaver. Read more
A cinematic tour of fake computer UIs

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When your film or TV show takes place in a high-tech landscape, an important part of the mise en scène is the computer interface that your protagonist / supervillain uses to save the planet / initiate the self-destruct sequence. But time and again, that blockbuster GUI is far too high-tech for the film’s setting… or just plain silly. According to a recent NPR interview with Hollywood interface designer Mark Coleran, this is no accident: the convention began in the early 1980s, when most people’s computer knowledge was limited to coin-op videogames. “The entire point of those things,” he says, “is to tell a story… in two seconds, onscreen.” Besides, who among us hasn’t wanted access to a smiley-faced “virus launch panel” at some point? Hit up the source links for some examples of UIs that have “gone Hollywood,” and feel free to drop any of your favorites into the comments.

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ZeroTouch 'optical multi-touch force field' makes a touchscreen out of just about anything

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The rise of tablets and smartphones has made the touchscreen a rather ubiquitous interface, but they aren’t everywhere quite yet. A group of students from Texas A&M intend to change that, however, with the invention of ZeroTouch: a seemingly empty picture frame that lets you turn any surface into an interactive touchscreen. It might not look like much, but ZeroTouch is packing a series of pulsing LEDs and infrared sensors that turn that blank space into a highly sensitive surface. Basically, the strategically placed LEDs cover the open area in a sheet of invisible light. When a hand or stylus enters the picture (or lack there of), those beams are interrupted, providing cues to a piece of software that tracks the object’s movement – and boom! You’ve got a touchscreen. Of course, this isn’t the sort of thing that’s going to make it to market anytime soon, but you can check out ZeroTouch rocking the rippling water effect in the video below. Read more