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Today is , celebrate by doing something great for the environment. Volunteer for community clean up or make a commitment to recycle more in 2019.







On , let us commit to protecting our planet by reducing pollution, fighting deforestation, and acting on climate change.




It's 🌐 ! 🌐 Join us today at 9:00 PDT for an with three of our rock stars Ask 'em your questions about any impacts of techs on the & wildlife.




I would like to take (today) to say SAVE THE SALTON SEA A shrinking Salton Sea could expose its toxic-coated bottom to wind storms, posing a major airpollution hazard!







This earth belongs to millions of other species as well. Our actions are taking away their space. This we need to realise that extinction is forever. There is no planet B.




On Earth Day, we are reminded of the importance of protecting our environment and doing our part to conserve our resources. Let’s make everyday Earth Day!







On , let’s pledge to keep it healthier and greener for future generations by reducing environmental footprints and protecting all endangered species.







Our actions impact the world around us and it's our responsibility to respect the where we live and work. We're committed to improving the environment through efforts to save resources and reduce our carbon footprint:




On , let’s pledge to keep it healthier and greener for future generations by reducing environmental footprints and protecting all endangered species.







On , let’s pledge to keep it healthier and greener for future generations by reducing environmental footprints and protecting all endangered species.




On , let’s pledge to keep it healthier and greener for future generations by reducing environmental footprints and protecting all endangered species.







On , let’s pledge to keep it healthier and greener for future generations by reducing environmental footprints and protecting all endangered species.




On , let’s pledge to keep it healthier and greener for future generations by reducing environmental footprints and protecting all endangered species.




Pro tip for tomorrow's international bazaar at THE WOODLANDS: We are promoting the use of personal containers instead of using disposable plates and utensils. Bring your own container and spoon/fork to help reduce waste 😁!!



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Happy Earth Day!!!

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You’ve heard of Soul music 🎶 but what do you know about Solar music◾️☀️🎵
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What a great👌🏼mobile 🚲 setup! We’re just gonna call this innovator DJ Solar 💽
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Green Energy♻️, Sunshine🌞, Solar◼️, and Music 🎼. We can’t think 🤷‍♂️ of a better combination!!
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Solar is made to be mobile 🤳🏽and so is the new SolarUp📲App!! Download 📥 it for FREE on the Apple 🍎 App Store today!! Coming soon to Google Play ▶️
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Clickable Link in Bio☝🏼
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https://www.instagram.com/p/BwkQJJXHlmr/?utm_source=ig_tumblr_share&igshid=r966hqu8zaxk

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Since the first Earth Day, the planet’s CO2 levels have gone off the rails

When Americans celebrated the first Earth Day on April 22, 1970, the planet’s atmosphere was markedly different than it is today. Nearly 50 years ago, scientists measured Earth’s levels of carbon dioxide — the planet’s most important greenhouse gas — at around 325 parts per million, or ppm.

Now, almost five decades later, that number has shot up to around 412 ppm, nearly 90 ppm higher. It’s a change atmospheric researchers, geologists, and climate scientists call unparalleled in at least 800,000 years, though it’s likely carbon dioxide levels haven’t been this high in millions years.

“The rate of CO2 increase since the first Earth Day is unprecedented in the geologic record,” said Dan Breecker, a paleoclimatologist at The University of Texas at Austin.

“No matter how you look at this it’s totally unprecedented,” agreed Kris Karnauskas, an associate professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder.

“The last time CO2 levels were this high, the sea level was many feet higher than it is today,” added Matthew Lachniet, a climate scientist at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas. This was a warmer geologic period on Earth called the Pliocene, spanning some 2.5 to 5 million years ago. Earth’s oceans were some 30 feet higher then, noted Lachniet, after the planet’s ice sheets melted into the sea.

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earth day - aine

- Just because we cannot see the immediate damage we are causing the earth, doesn’t mean it’s not there. Earth day lets us appreciate what a beautiful world we have the pleasure of existing in, but reminds us that we must treat the world kindly for it to treat us kind back. Look into how you can do little things to make a change and stop the devastation humanity is carelessly causing. In fifty years, we will wish we had started sooner. By then, it’ll simply be too late.

Giving Plants Legal Rights Could Help Save the Planet

Who has rights? What rights do they have? Can circumstances change regarding who does and doesn’t have rights? And should entities other than humans have rights? These are some of the central questions posed by legislation passed in late December by the White Earth Band of Ojibwe in Minnesota to ensure the rights something unexpected: manoomin wild rice.

The statutes represent landmark legislation in the United States since they are the first “to recognize legal rights of a plant species,” said Mari Margil, head of the International Center for the Rights of Nature at the Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund (CELDF). The new statutes, drafted in consultation with CELDF, include provisions to allow manoomin to “exist, flourish, regenerate, and evolve.” Consistent with this goal is the right to have pure water and a healthy climate system, the right to be free from patents, and the right to be free from contamination by genetically engineered organisms.

In summary, manoomin wild rice is deserving of legal standing in U.S. courts — legal personhood. This would allow people, or organizations, to bring lawsuits on behalf of wild rice arguing that the grain itself was being harmed through an action. There would be no need to demonstrate that a person, or another entity with legal personhood, like a corporation, was being harmed.

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Happy Earth Day 🌻🌲🐝🦈🐳🦂🌵🌾🦚🐓🐘

In reality, every day feels like earth day for me 😂 Celebrate this planet we live on by doing anything g you can do yo make it a better place. Try a zero waste challenge, pick up garbage, plant flowers, dont eat meat or animal products. Do whatever you can today, be proud that you care about the environment, and thank you for caring 🌎

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More than 80% of parents in the U.S. support the teaching of climate change. And that support crosses political divides, according to the results of an exclusive new NPR/Ipsos poll: Whether they have children or not, two-thirds of Republicans and 9 in 10 Democrats agree that the subject needs to be taught in school.

A separate poll of teachers found that they are even more supportive, in theory — 86% agree that climate change should be taught.

These polls are among the first to gauge public and teacher opinion on how climate change should be taught to the generation that in the coming years will face its intensifying consequences: children.

And yet, as millions of students around the globe participate in Earth Day events on Monday, our poll also found a disconnect. Although most states have classroom standards that at least mention human-caused climate change, most teachers aren’t actually talking about climate change in their classrooms. And fewer than half of parents have discussed the issue with their children.

Most Teachers Don’t Teach Climate Change; 4 In 5 Parents Wish They Did

Illustration: Angela Hsieh/NPR
Charts: Alyson Hurt/NPR

anonymous asked:

hello acti! i've started watching the new netflix documentary our planet which shows the ramifications of human-caused climate change to different habitats. they invite the viewer to think about and actively do for our planet and refer to their and wwfs websites for tips. no mention of veganism whatsoever. while i'm not exactly surprised it does make me very angry. do you think it is sensible to write to them and ask for a statement or explanation on why they're leaving veganism out?

I’ve been watching it to, to be honest I really didn’t expect any mention of veganism, but I hoped for at least some coverage on animal agriculture. It’s notably absent from most environmental documentaries and campaigns, it’s a mixture of how much power animal agriculture industries have and how much of a personal stake people have in denial. It’s easy to condemn fossil fuel companies, but less easy to highlight how your own animal prodict consumption needs to change. It’s also only recently been part of the discourse on environmentalism, over the last five years or so. Hopefully we see a bit more progress on that soon, but it’s still very disappointing to have it so routinely ignored.