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"Hiya Darren" more tomfoolery from the Renaissance range by @idonotcareds. . . . .
















Iris Apfel teaches us that is not at odds with . A maximalist style that conquered around the world🌍. Our model borns of this inspiration ➡















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Our most popular and loved dessert, 'The Lotus Mess'. A combination so good it will surely have you reaching out for a second one.





















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Outfit of the day. A long blue dress cardigan, with a thrifted brown top and black jeans.

instagram

Gotta love our loved ones on the other side. 🙏🏼❤️🌠 #faith #hope #spiritual #spiritguide #angels #eclectic #ancestors #latino #nativeamerican #keepitreal #byebyenegativeenergy #youcantbeatme ✌🏼😎
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February 20th 2019 Energy Report 🌹

☀Sun in Pisces ♓ until 3/20/2019:

Promotes:

  • Creativity, dreams, sensitivity

Ruled by Neptune:

Promotes:

  • dreams, imagination

❄Winter season until 3/20/2019:

  • Rest
  • Self acceptance
  • Rebirth

🌔🌕🌖Moon void of course @ 8:51 PM EST

  • rest and reflect

🌖Waning moon

  • Best time to work on : moving forward, gratitude and thanks
  • Promotes: new knowledge

All in all-

Take this time to gather where you are, how did you get here? Give thanks to what has helped you on your path. Today be considerate of others

Emoji spell:

🕯🌹 🌹 🌹🕯,🌹🕯 🌹 🌹 🌹 🕯

Affirmation:

I am a fountain of gratitude for all those around me and myself, I appreciate and respect all energies that present themselves and look forward to experiencing them accordingly.

Originally posted by positiveupwardspiral

Blessed Be

🌹

Eclecticism or Cultural Appropriation?

Mythology is wonderful. Religious art is beautiful. Magical practice is empowering. Ecelectic foundations are inspiring. Cultural appropriation is harmful… but we can still delve into the similarities of differing cultures when we approach our inspired eclectic practice with knowledge and respect. Studying the paths we are discussing with a hands on approach and seeking practitioners of each we are empowering not only our practice but the mystics and scholars of the past and present as well.

I come from a Jodo Shinshu Buddhist and Japanese Martial Arts and Scientology upbringing, so I was thrown into an eclectic mix from birth. My father’s side is Japanese (I am yonsei, or fourth generation, half blood) and my mothers family stems from Ireland, Switzerland, and the Natives of Arizona (Tohono O'odham Nation), although the percentage on my mothers side is speculative.

My parents were divorced when I was a wee child so me and my brother were thrown around from mother to father every 6-12 months, so I got a handful of different spiritual and philosophical beliefs.

Scientology, when you take out all the bullshit (ridiculous fees, cult mentality, and deception), has similar concepts to NLP (emotional tone scale), psychotherapy (auditing), magical intiation (Bridge to Total Freedom), magical awareness training (Training Routines [TR’s] and Objectives), and a fun, multi-world extraterrestrial mythology (Thetans and the Space Opera).

Jodo Shinshu, or Pure Land, Buddhism is more like a Japanese Christianity; be kind, be generous, attend funerals and Church Activities (mainly the Obon Festival, or Festival of Souls).

In Martial Arts I learned guided meditation, Zazen (void) meditation, standing and moving meditation (kata, or forms, and qigong), traditional combat applications with my body and sticks and knives (not to be confused with modern military and law enforcement combatives).

It’s okay to be eclectic. It’s okay to practice a foreign religion or magical practice, and it’s okay to share knowledge, but be smart about it. Respect the path(s) chosen. If someone of the culture gets offended, communicate with them and seek to gain knowledge from them. I cannot tell someone to stop their practice, especially if there are results and spiritual expansion involved, but understand that some people take their cultural practices very seriously, as they should, and many modern practitioners are really just in it for the fad, for the idea of power, and to gain magical points.

Are you serious about this foreign path or are you just doing it because it’s ‘cool’?

Are you seeking out practitioners and philosophies in relation to the path or just throwing in this and that because it fits your aesthetic?

End Note

I write this as I am one to acquire knowledge from very different paths, but I seek to unify them in my own practice. I see similarities, I am inspired by different practices. Although I understand each path is unique per culture, I also see commonalities where others might not. I believe we have a right to learn and share knowledge, of our cultures and others, but only with study, praxis, and respect.