Posts on Twitter:

Are we going too fast on cars? 🔘 Any level of driving gets described by the media as „driverless“ 🔘 Nobody is even close to deploying a SAE- vehicle







Bored on your commute? Want to hear how driverless tech is helping clear Afghanistan’s land mines or the retro robot car created in the 1960s? Listen to the latest episode of the A-Z of Tech podcast with curator Margaret Campbell




Bored on your commute? Want to hear how driverless tech is helping clear Afghanistan’s land mines or the retro robot car created in the 1960s? Listen to the latest episode of the A-Z of Tech podcast with curator Margaret Campbell







The and team will be heading to the upcoming Lates event on technology. Check out their interactive quiz and tell them what YOU think about drones. Book your FREE ticket now!







As part of our sponsorship of the latest exhibition, we’re excited to announce that we’ll be showcasing our interactive quiz and pop up at the next 'Lates' event on 28 August. Book your tickets now:




The and team will be heading to the upcoming Lates event on technology. Check out their interactive quiz and tell them what YOU think about drones. Book your FREE ticket now!







London's Science Museum has selected our project for its exhibition. On show the ultimate design innovations paving the way for autonomous mobility.




The and team will be heading to the upcoming Lates event on technology. Check out their interactive quiz and tell them what YOU think about drones. Book your FREE ticket now!













LATEST NEWS:Waymo is taking some of its .s to Florida just in time for hurricane season to begin testing in heavy rain MORE:during summer months of hurricane season, Miami is one of the wettest..




cars: How will insurers be affected? Reduction of accidents vs increase in claim size, Elimination of fraudulent claims, Move away from insuring drivers to vehicles, risk of cyber hack. Thatcham research thinks driver insurance will remain “for a long time to come”.












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See London through the eyes of a self-driving car
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When a driverless car glides down the street, avoiding pedestrians and stopping at traffic lights, what exactly does it see? Is the machine’s perspective of the world so different to you and me? To give us an inside look, ScanLAB Projects strapped a laser scanner to a Honda CR-V and cruised through the streets of London. Although the car was being driven by a human, the LIDAR (light detection and ranging) equipment performed similarly to how it would in a driverless car. Like radar or sonar, this involves firing a laser in every direction and then measuring the time it takes to reflect back off nearby objects. These timings are then collected, analyzed and collected again to give the car a real-time picture of its surroundings. ScanLAB Projects is a London design company that uses the technology for art and visualisation purposes; they’ve already scanned museums, an underground railway line and the arctic circle. Its latest video – produced for the New York Times Magazinecombines the LIDAR recordings from the drive for a beautiful, eery look at the city.

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Editorial: Self-driving cars FTW, but not for everybody
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I drive a two-seat roadster known for its great handling. The last thing I want is for a machine to take the steering wheel out of my hands. My car company isn’t into self-driving cars, but others are: Ford, BMW, Audi. And, of course, Google is moving quickly forward with road-worthy autocars that have accumulated 300,000 miles with only one (human error) accident. The advantages of cars that drive themselves are multiple and compelling.

Automobile intelligence already assists the driving experience by warning of dangerous situations and taking control of parking, which is, for some people, the most difficult maneuver to perform. We are gradually ceding control to our cars. When a completely automated consumer car launches, some drivers will hand over the reins gladly. But for me and other enthusiasts, driving a car isn’t just about reaching a destination; it’s about the journey and operating a beautiful machine. Unfortunately for people who feel that way, the greatest social benefits of self-driving cars would kick in if everyone were herded into a new era of hands-off driving.

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How Google's robotic cars deal with human stupidity
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Like the Terminator T-800, Google’s self-driving cars don’t feel pity, remorse or fear. But they also never lose their patience or get distracted by smartphones, and Google has revealed data collected by its vehicles showing just how bad we human drivers can get. It said the goal with the Medium article was to improve road safety by reminding us that “driver error causes 94 percent of crashes.” Program director Chris Urmson said that “our safety drivers routinely see people weaving in and out of their lanes; we’ve spotted people reading books, and even one playing a trumpet.”

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Google publishes the boring details of its self-driving car accidents
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While Google prepares to move its driverless car tests from modified hatchbacks and SUVs to the custom prototype shown above, questions keep popping up about any accidents they’ve been in (even though the car itself has not been at fault). Earlier this week Google co-founder Sergey Brin stook questions about those accidents, and today the company issued the first of a series of monthly breakdowns on its autonomous driving tests. USA Today says the reports will include info about any incidents, as well as other anecdotes and examples of how the cars handle every day traffic situations. Of course, if Google wanted to hide any information about its progress then it has found the perfect way – it turns out that reading about a car getting rear-ended at stop lights incredibly boring, even if it’s a self-driving car that was hit.

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UK's first driverless 'pod' readies itself for public trials
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Britain wants to be at the forefront of driverless car technology, so it’s funding a handful of research projects that will look at different vehicle designs and how people react to them. One of those initiatives, led by Transport Systems Catapult and the RDM Group, is inching closer towards public trials today with the unveiling of a new “Lutz Pathfinder” pod. We first saw the vehicle back in February, covered with Union Jack decals, but that was actually just a prototype. The new two-seater pod unveiled this morning is far closer to completion – it just needs to visit Oxford University’s Mobile Robotics Group, where it’ll be fitted with an autonomous control system. Researchers will then do a number of calibration tests on a private test track, before it’s finally sent out for public testing in Milton Keynes.

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The autonomous shuttle hoping to transform public transport
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A common criticism of self-driving vehicles is that many people, especially petrolheads, love getting behind the wheel and putting the pedal to the floor. It’s true that some companies are developing autonomous replacements for the car on your driveway, but others are taking a slightly different approach. While the technology is still in its infancy, they’re building driverless vehicles that supplement, rather than replace, traditional motors and public transport, with the idea being that they could ferry urbanites across short distances. An autonomous bus might sound less exciting than the recently rumored self-driving Apple car, but it could prove more useful and achievable, at least in the near future.

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This simulator wants to solve a big problem with self-driving cars: you
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Self-driving cars are edging ever closer to becoming smart, reliable motors people can actually buy from their local dealerships. Google’s crafted its first cheery prototype and Audi’s driverless RS7 will happily whip around a test track at 150MPH. But while autonomous-vehicle technology is maturing, engineers and researchers still have plenty of challenges ahead. Many of them revolve around human interaction – when driverless cars finally enter the public domain, they’re likely to come with standard controls, including pedals and a steering wheel. Despite their ability to cruise around independently, these vehicles will require a manual override just in case the driver needs to retake control. But how exactly will that human-machine changeover play out inside the vehicle?

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UK to introduce new road laws allowing the use of self-driving cars
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Not to be left behind by developments in the US, the UK government is set to rewrite road laws to allow self-driving cars on Britain’s roads. According to Mail Online, science minister David Willetts has already opened discussions with the Department for Transport to help British companies develop their own driverless cars and encourage the world’s car companies to do the same. Willetts’ comments come just weeks after Google showed off its new self-driving prototypes that don’t come equipped with a steering wheel, mirrors or pedals. As we’ve noted before, laws covering driverless cars are still new, with only a few US states, including California, Nevada, Michigan, Florida and the District of Columbia, giving them the green light (but require someone to sit in the passenger seat, at least for now). The UK government aims to follow suit, allowing researchers at Oxford University, who have pioneered a cheaper version of Google’s self-driving tech, to legally test different driving scenarios on (hopefully quiet) British roads.

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Autonomous golf carts drive tourists around in Singapore
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MIT and the National Research Foundation of Singapore recently tested an autonomous vehicle they developed together. No, it’s not a car or a truck – it’s a golf cart. The researchers created a self-driving golf cart called SMART and deployed several at a public garden to drive 500 or so tourists around during a six-day experiment. Since they crafted a whole system and not just the autonomous vehicle itself, they also tested a booking method which people used to schedule pick-ups and drop offs. In the future, that system could be adapted to a mobile app like Uber.

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#lausanne #driverless busses moving around the university. #speachless (presso Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL))

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NASA’s very own MRV(Modular Robotic Vehicle).
Self Driving USP.
Electric powered vehicle.
All 4 wheels motoring independently.
#Badass eh?
Top speed at 40mph but limited to 15mph.
Sizing 7ft X 5ft
Google should be in a #BadMood

#automobile #tech #driverless #nasa #technology
#science #space #art #cars #auto #selfdriving #google #mrv #techoftheday #test #testdrive (at MMOB)

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Domino’s launches world’s first driverless pizza delivery vehicles

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(vía ▶ Driverless Passenger - YouTube)

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A vista do maquinista, mas sem o maquinista! #Driverless #Via4 #PelasRuasQueAndei #DiariodeUmImigrante #meus15vids (em Linha Amarela Estação República)

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