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Excited to share the latest addition to my shop: Coal Miners Go Deeper Men's T







Coal Myth #1 Coal is Cheap !!! Northwestern Energy Claims Coal cost is $20 / MWh this is not true when you include Externalities Reclamation, Decommissioning Bond, Environmental Costs as well as health




Obama-Era Judge Slams The Brakes On Trump Order To Open Fed Lands To Mining




Obama-Era Judge Slams The Brakes On Trump Order To Open Fed Lands To Mining















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Obama-Era Judge Slams The Brakes On Trump Order To Open Fed Lands To Mining










Obama-Era Judge Slams The Brakes On Trump Order To Open Fed Lands To Mining




Freundliches Fußballspiel zwischen 3 Teams , & Vierbeiner. Mit Einheimischen, die mit Stil zuschauen.... Town to be destroyed for climate killing lives, breathes & plays... ?!



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Obama-Era Judge Slams The Brakes On Trump Order To Open Fed Lands To Mining












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xcreønx - røal

reuters.com
Federal court dismisses Trump administration's repeal of coal, oil...
A federal court has struck down the Trump administration’s repeal of an Obama-era policy aimed at boosting revenue for taxpayers by changing how energy companies value sales of coal, oil and gas extracted from federal and tribal land.

Excerpt from this Reuters story:

The decision, which found the Interior Department’s repeal of the so-called valuation rule was “arbitrary and capricious”, was the latest blow to the Trump administration’s “energy dominance” agenda in the courts, where environmental groups and some states have challenged dozens of de-regulatory actions.

“Once again, the Trump Administration has been checked by the courts in its unlawful attempt to bend over backwards to please special interests at the expense of hardworking Americans,” California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said in a statement late on Friday.

Becerra said the district court ruling would result in $71 million a year more in royalties for U.S. taxpayers from companies that mine or drill on federal lands.

The Interior Department is currently reviewing the decision, agency spokeswoman Molly Block said on Monday. Interior and industry group interveners have 60 days to appeal the decision.

The valuation rule was proposed by former Interior Secretary Sally Jewell in 2016 to close a loophole that enabled companies to dodge royalty payments when mining on taxpayer-owned public land. It required energy companies to pay royalties on sales to the first unaffiliated customer, known as an arm’s-length sale, as the fuel moves to market.

A Reuters investigation found in 2012 that coal companies were using affiliated brokers to settle royalty payments on exports to Asia at much lower domestic prices.

In early 2017, former Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke announced the agency would move to repeal the rule, which he said increased costs for coal, oil and gas companies and hampered production on federal lands, “making us rely more and more on foreign imports of oil and gas.”

front of my notebook, it’s not finished but I don’t just want to use the platforms I’ve got to show finished stuff, I enjoy taking pictures during and after so people may have a chance to connect to my thought process/emotion/how it changes, I never (98.9%) have a strong idea what I want to draw when I start, I let it come to me.. so the word “tricuspoid” just happened to be there when I started, and it’s the place it’s been given and shall not, and can not be moved, and that’s okay, because some things we don’t have control over, I’m learning how to accept that

Just some more photos from Centralia, PA.

Photo Credits for above photo: @carpenoctem22

Fun Fact: Vidoe game series and movie Silent Hill are inspired by Centralia, PA.

If you haven’t visited Centralia and are in the area, I highly recommend making the trip. For those of you who don’t know why Centralia is such a special town here is some background. The town used to be a populated coal mining town until a fire was accidentally lite below. They failed to realize that the town was located on a natural coal strip so as the fire continued to burn the sidewalks and roads started to be pushed up from the heat(pictured above). This became dangerous along with the rising carbon monoxide levels so the government bought out the towns inhabitants property in attempt to convince them all to relocate. Now it is a modern day ghost town owned by the state of Pennsylvania. It is home to what many know as Graffiti Highway(pictured above) and if you go at the right times you can see smoke rising from areas within it and a nearby graveyard. When we were venturing the woods right next to the highway we found an old highway spot that was taken back by nature and within the opening below the raised asphalt slab you could literally feel the heat coming from below where the fire still burns today. I posted a picture of this separately.

Kianna’s Bestiary - “Sleepy Bear” Coal

Every now and then I’ll throw up a post detailing one of the beasts people are likely to see Kianna with on a regular basis. The second entry in the bestiary series belongs to Coal, my main leveling and dungeon pet at the moment. The entry on Flank, the Lovable Bacon, can be found here.

Every master of beasts worth their salt had to prove it by taming all manner of dangerous creatures, and Kianna was no exception. While she had practiced her craft on the lesser creatures of Elwynn and Westfall, going after boar and deer alike, she knew that her first real test would come at the hands of one of the predators in the Stormwind region. Her intention had been to go after one of the wolves that made their home in the forest, but life had different plans for her.

It had been an expedition into the haunted forests of Duskwood that would bring her face to face with one of her most steadfast companions. Kianna had ventured south through the kingdom in pursuit of a bounty on some particularly troublesome feral worgen. Her journey brought her to the outskirts of the Raven Hill Cemetery, and she hadn’t been properly prepared for the dangers of the area. Before she knew it, she had placed herself between one of the coalpelt bears that called the area home and its prey, and inadvertently taken the latter’s place. The beast fell on her with surprising speed, and it became a matter of survival.

In the end, Kianna’s will won out, and (in a stroke of extremely poor creativity when it came to naming) Coal became the newest beast to submit to her craft. The black bear has been a loyal companion to the beastmistress for years, and is a constant presence at her side when she expects there to be danger present. When not active and alert, Coal can often be found sleeping at her feet, earning him his title.