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This is not just a boutonnière, this is a piece of jewellery.




Controlling the camera from my phone is certainly a new, and exciting experience 😂 . .co jacket, MTM trouser and shirt, and pocket square. . . . …













The Merchant Bright Navy Herringbone Coat and Fox Brothers Camel Prince of Wales Scarf. It will be getting colder in UK again so nice layers are required to keep warm. The coat has been made in a Limited Edition Fox cloth in 530/560g (19/20oz)







Full kit. Donegal sport coat, limited vintage oxford, and MTM pleated chinos (love them so much I already have another pair in the works). . . . …







The Merchant Fox: getting ready for the week. Our Kenneth Field Worker Shirt, combined with our Fox Midnight Herringbone Flat Cap, Char Navy Fox Flannel Tie and Fox Brothers Camel Prince of Wales Scarf

























Today’s charity shop purchases. Methodically emptied and appraised a big box of ties. These six were 99p each including one incredibly colourful bow-tie and the rest are very flexible to go with my autumnal colours.







The Merchant Chocolate Houndstooth Blazer. Part of our series of blazers in signature Limited Edition Fox Brothers cloth, woven in the West of England. Made in Italy with lots of refined details such as the handmade buttonholes



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Last week too…

One of my favourite associations: cavalry twill and tweed. The two fabrics are designed to withstand the weather but they are classic menswear basics— the middle-ground between hard-wearing essentials and sophisticated textures. @tieyourtiefirenze-blog

Alberto Voglio, bespoke Neapolitan trousers. The real thing

Trousers are rarely as flamboyant and snazzy as a jacket can be. Contrary to a jacket, the fancy work doesn’t really show unless you’re looking closely, which is something that people in the street will seldom do when they see your trousers—while you may find people stealing glances at your shoulders, you usually don’t find them staring at your crotch or turn-ups.

Trouser-makers are like bass players in jazz: you only notice them when there’s something wrong. Trousers may be somewhat implicit that way, but it takes a lot of work and artfulness to provide a great background for an outfit. You may add buttons and stitching all you want, trousers are not about gimmicks. Trousers are about something that cannot quite be perceived: fit, mostly. What can be seen is the flow of the leg, its straight-arrow perfection, the easy drop of fabric but it remains, at most, a subtle rather than a spectacular quality.

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