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We've had a fantastic morning running a workshop with - on with a group of young people in part of activity programme Thanks Charlene










By 2020, and businesses could amount up to $90 billion dollars and $30 billion dollars respectively. Download the executive summary of our recent report now:







Pareal ONE | 60° FoV Diffractive Waveguide, Snapdragon 835, Standalone, 170g | Gesture, Face, Image Recognition













Longread article by about machines and humans perception of the world in Augmented Reality. The article looks at how each of these groups perceives the world.













RT Ronald_vanLoon: 12 Key Emerging Technologies in the 4th Industrial Revolution [] by wef | Read more at Cc: MikeQuin…







RT Ronald_vanLoon: 12 Key Emerging Technologies in the 4th Industrial Revolution [] by wef | Read more at Cc: MikeQuin…







RT scapicxr: At our 2nd community meet-up based around 'Future of Content' and Here's rocketium Addressing the community.









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Scientists testing HUD contact lenses on rabbits, hope to bring augmented reality to your eyeballs

Scientists at Washington University are a step closer to bringing us all some sweet information displaying contact lenses. The team has been successfully testing prototype lenses on rabbits – though there are some major caveats here. First, due to limits of circuitry, they can only display a single light-emitting diode at a time. Also, the scientists have yet to figure out a workable energy source – at present, they need to be within centimeters of a wireless battery. The researchers have big plans, however, including the display of holographic images – and, no doubt, information about which targets to destroy.

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iPhone in iPhone app is useless, but mesmerizing
Here’s the premise: you take a good old fashioned augmented reality setup, the likes of which we’ve seen all over the land, and attach a three-dimensional, rotatable iPhone to it. Not impressed yet, are you? Neither were we, but there’s some secret sauce to this one: you can actually launch apps on the simulated iPhone. That extra layer of interactivity makes the video after the break a lot more fascinating than it has any right to be, though it’s worth pointing out that we don’t think the apps are actually usable – they just give the illusion of launching. Anyhow, don’t wait around while all the cool kids are watching it, go have a gander yourself. Read more
Symbian Foundation teases augmented reality/social networking tool, says you'll probably never get it (video)

What do you do when everyone’s talking about the competition’s exciting new take on navigation? Why, you come up with your exciting new angle that’s way cooler than theirs then sit back and guffaw while high-fiving your co-workers. That seems to be what Symbian Foundation is attempting here, with a teaser of a tool that would let you not only easily interact with Facebook events but also get real-time augmented reality navigation straight to them. It looks fancy enough, but there’s a big catch: the company has no current plans of making it a reality, saying it’s “not part of the Symbian UI Roadmap.” Carry on, then, nothing to see after the break but a mobile Web 2.0 pipe dream. Read more
Video: Hands-on with SPRXmobile's Layar augmented reality browser for Android

We had a chance to go hands-on with Layar, the new augmented reality browser from SPRXmobile. Launched yesterday on Android Market in The Netherlands, we were curious to see how the software, that looked damn-impressive in the promo video, would function in actual use, in this case, from the living room of SPRXmobile’s Maarten Lens-FitzGerald just outside of Amsterdam. Our take? it’s the real-deal, especially for a v1 release. The software looks rock-solid and the initial data layers – ATMs, social joints like cafes and clubs, and job listings – appear fully populated and thus, useful. The ATM and cafe/club layers (or layars) are definitely helpful for serendipitous discovery though we’re still scratching our heads over the job search layar. See, what you’re discovering are jobs you can apply for from that particular employment office, not jobs necessarily available in that specific neighborhood or office building. Next month, Layar will have access to what could be its killer app (or killer data layar) called Funda, the site in The Netherlands for finding places to rent or buy. Of course, you can imagine travel guide companies like Let’s Go and Frommers jumping into this with huge effect as well. And really, it’s content that’s going to make this type of augmented reality software a success. Maarten tells us that more partner announcements are expected this week with expansion into the US, Germany, and UK anticipated later this year on Android devices and on the iPhone 3G S (compass required). Check the interview and demo after the break.

Update: New layers announced including Google local search (that’s a ton of content), Tweets Nearby (exactly what it sounds like), and ANWB (Dutch AAA) coming in July. Read more
Video: SPRXmobile's Layar is world's first Augmented Reality browser for cellphones

This one’s been a long time coming but it looks like Dutch company SPRXmobile has launched the world’s first Augmented Reality browser. Layar, as it’s called, runs on Android and aggregates the data from the cellphone’s compass and GPS coordinates to understand where you’re standing and what you’re looking at. A “radar view” then applies a visual information layer on top of the camera display as you pan around your environment. Content partnerships including a local bank, social networking site, and a realty company allows Layar to identify houses for sale, nearby ATMs, and local clubs and bars all laid out visually on your cellphone’s display. Layar will be available this month in The Netherlands via the Android Market for phones such as the G1 and HTC Magic. It will launch in the US, Germany, and the UK sometime later this year with the iPhone 3G S listed as a primary target platform. Looks great with plenty of data populated in the video sample (posted after the break) but we have to wonder how well it works in day-to-day reality. Read more
Google's Vic Gundotra tries Project Glass on for size

Looks like we’re starting to get a little insight into Google’s Project Glass testing process. Seems like the augmented reality glasses need to make their way onto every head on the Google staff, before the company feels confident moving ahead with them. First we caught sight of co-founder Sergey Brin, then it was Sebastian Thrun of Project X fame, and now social exec Vic Gundotra is getting a crack. He looks reasonably happy, so that’s probably a good sign, right?

Update: Looks like Google employee Sebastian Thrun actually tried one on… and got a photo of what it looks like from the inside. Head on the past the break for a glimpse.

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Google testing heads-up display glasses in public, won't make you look like Robocop

The good news: Google has started testing those augmented reality glasses we heard about earlier in the year. The bad news: if the artsy shots of the test units are to be believed, they won’t make you look like some ‘80s cinematic anti-hero. In fact, the things wouldn’t look too out of place in a New York Times style story. The software giant let it be known that, while it hasn’t quite got a sale date on the wearables, it’s ready to test ProjectGlass amongst the non-augmented public. The company is also looking for feedback on the project, writing in a post today, “we want to start a conversation and learn from your valuable input.” Want some idea of what ProjectGlass might offer the public? Sure, it’s not quite as good as strapping a pair on your own eyes, but interested parties can check out a video of Google’s vision after the break.

Update: Might this be known as Google Eye? Given that Google owns googleeye.com, it’s certainly cropping up as a possibility.

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Head-mounted AR trainer is another Star Trek prop come to life (video)

Those of you familiar with the Dominion headsets from Star Trek: Deep Space Nine will probably guess exactly what this wearable AR system does from the picture alone. Japan’s institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology is putting the finishing touches on a device to help newbies through complex and dangerous jobs. A head-mounted GoPro Hero 2 HD relays a picture back to an expert, who directs the action while wearing colored gloves. Using color separation, just the hand movements are sent back to the user, processed by a Toughbook in a backpack and overlaid onto the Shimadzu Data Glass HUD. There’s nothing special about the tech, but that’s what makes it so likely we’ll see this making the leap to reality – more so, because all of the components are off-the-shelf. The only issue is with the unit’s software calibration, which takes far too long, but AIST hopes to remedy this over time. Just be careful if you see a backseat driver with blue gloves – they could make your life miserable.

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Sphero the smartphone controlled ball gets ready to roll out, we go hands-on (video)

The plucky little white ball that first rolled its way into our hearts back at CES is back, and now it’s getting ready to continue its journey onto store shelves. Sphero is a little plasticLED-lit orb that can be controlled using a number of smartphone applications. The toy’s makers like to refer to it as a “real-world Wii,” letting users control it either via a phone’s touchscreen or with gestures, using the handset’s accelerometer. The ball itself is palm-sized – it feels like a standard toy ball, until you give it a bit of a shake, feeling its insides jiggle.

At present, the company is showcasing three apps – one for standard driving in real-time, one that lets the user draw paths with their fingers and a third “golf” app, that offers the most Wii-like interaction, with the user swinging their smartphone like a club to move the ball. The apps are straightforward and let you change Sphero’s color. All in all, the company seems to have come a ways since first showcasing earlier prototypes back in January. You can expect to see Sphero start shipping before the end of the year, for $129 a pop. It will be compatible with both iOS and Android. We hand fun with the thing, but who knows how long it will take to get sick of it. Thankfully, it will launch with three to six apps, with more coming soon. Hands-on video after the break.%Gallery-133801% Read more
Watch this: Sony demos two new augmented reality tricks

No, Sony’s not coming out with a new augmented-reality toy just yet, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t working behind the scenes to make its graphics look a little more… believable. The company just posted two videos out of its PlayStation lab in Japan, both of which hint at what it could be like to play future PlayStation Move games. In the first, we see a man holding two three-dimensional boxes, one of them with water inside (Sony’s signature rubber duckie is there too). As he pours the water back and forth from one box to the other, we see the water splash up onto the floor and sloshing back and forth, sometimes even covering the duck. Not “believable,” you say? Check out the second video, which shows someone casting a flashlight on a dinosaur in a darkened room (just go with it, OK), with the shadows changing as the light moves on and off the subject. We’ve embedded both vids below, though you might still want to check out Sony’s PlayStation blog post – there’s reference to some new trading-card recognition feature, though there’s sadly no video demo to go with it.

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Lowe's has a Tango AR app for home improvement projects

We’ve explored the Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya using Google’s Tango technology, and we’ve also used it for a little gaming. Now that Lenovo is bringing the first Tango device for the masses, we’re also going to see new augmented reality software that make use of Google’s 3D mapping software tech. Lowe’s, the hardware and home improvement store chain, has an app of its own that allows you to place appliances, add accessories and make other virtual tweaks to your house before you begin a project.

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Canon overhauls Mixed Reality platform with new head-mounted display

Canon’s been fiddling around with augmented (or mixed) reality for some time now, but the company just took things to the next level. A new AR headset announced today is less stylish than that other soon-to-be-released wearable tech you’ve likely heard about, yet certainly more sophisticated than its bigger brother. The controller sees visual markers through dual on-board cameras and projects virtual objects onto two corresponding displays set right above the eyes, marrying the virtual world to the desert of the real. You can gaze from any angle and even manipulate the virtual projects with what looks to be a plastic, magic ice cream cone. The glasses are set to release next month and, while Canon hasn’t assigned a price, all the planned applications are decidedly industrial, making us think they won’t be cheap. So, you probably won’t be using em’ to scope out the various Layars around your hood.

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Layar now adding layers of augmented reality to iPhone

Since your Android handset-owning friends and colleagues can’t have all the phone, Layar has finally made the leap to iPhone. It’s now available in the iTunes app store for the enticing price of nada, with its own third-party ecosystem to boot – only iPhone 3GS customers need apply, though, since without the magnetometer this is kind of a wash. We’ve only spent a few minutes with the new version, but it seems like much of our initial impressions from August seem to hold true, for better and for worse. But don’t take our word for it, download away! [Warning: iTunes link]

[Via Wired]

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Layar now adding layers of augmented reality to iPhone

Since your Android handset-owning friends and colleagues can’t have all the phone, Layar has finally made the leap to iPhone. It’s now available in the iTunes app store for the enticing price of nada, with its own third-party ecosystem to boot – only iPhone 3GS customers need apply, though, since without the magnetometer this is kind of a wash. We’ve only spent a few minutes with the new version, but it seems like much of our initial impressions from August seem to hold true, for better and for worse. But don’t take our word for it, download away! [Warning: iTunes link]

[Via Wired]

Read more