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is coming. That means giving = . -autistic…






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Do neurotypicals genuinely, truly think autistic people enjoy being picky with food? Or they choose to starve because they can’t eat certain things? Not only is it torturous to have severe headaches and hunger pains, but why do we always get chastised or made fun of for this? It’s happened to me for as long as I can remember.

I honestly still think that i have add or adhd instead of asd because i can remember me having a shitty memory and concentrate issues and time issues and executive disfunction from when i was younger (and i still have those now as well) but the problems i have now that may be because of asd werent present when i was younger. like i used to make friends so easy and love making friends and be social and i got it but now im like.. do i.. say hi? are we friends idk how this works?? but if i didnt have that when i was younger, is it asd then tho? and also the symptoms i have now that are asd, could also be because of add so i dont. know. what. to. think. or. belive. halp

I’ve said it before and I’m saying it again. Ragging on people for being “obsessed” with things (ie, fandoms) for no reason other than they’re “weird” and “annoyingIS inherently ableist.

Having intense interests is a neurodivergent trait, and singling it out as abnormal proves your ableist bias.

Note that I’m not saying you’re not allowed to criticize any fan ever for their behavior. Of course people are responsible for their behavior whether they’re ND or not. What I’m talking about is run-of-the-mill making fun and othering of people for having obsessions. It’s literally no different from the bullying performed by kids as young as kindergarten age.

Speaking of kids, people who do this should be even more ashamed if the person they’re targeting is high school age or younger. Let neurodivergent kids and adults have special interests and hyperfixations without being ostracized!

Sometimes I love being autistic, sometimes I hate being autistic. During both of these times, my feelings about my autism are the result of how the people around me are treating me because of it. Being autistic is who I am, how I feel about it is determined by how those around me treat me.

featherydick-muffins  asked:

How do I explain to my mum that stimming helps me calm down? She tells me to stop anytime I start stimming and sometimes tells me to stop because "it makes me look like a moron"

First of all fuck I’m sorry :/

Im Not So Great at social situations esp illogical neurotypicals who’re in charge of me telling me to stop being autistic/AHDH but imo the only thing that works is being blunt but polite. Tell her you’re more concerned about calming yourself down than about what you look like when you need to calm down.

I hope she leaves you alone about it, so good luck with whatever you decide :/

My Grandma would always stay after me and watch me to make sure I didn’t chew things like my pencil or my fingernails even tho chewing helps me focus, so eventually I just forced myself to stop entirely. I’m trying to start again but there’s not too many things I can chew but not destroy and which have the right texture mreeehhhh

Anti self-dx people really just dont understand how shitty the American healthcare system is

Guess what? I am actually on state-sponsored Medicaid because I dont work (disabled!) and I went through all the appropriate channels to get diagnosed with auditory processing disorder (primary care doc > ENT > Neurologist) but when my neurologist tried to refer me to a neurpsych (same people who do autism diagnoses in my state!) for diagnosis, it got denied. Literally because Im over 18 and Medicaid just doesnt cover neuropsychs for adults where I live.

According to my psychiatrist, she doesnt have the credentials to diagnose me with autism. The ONLY PEOPLE who do autism diagnosis in my state are neuropsychologists. Maybe its different where you live. But thats how it is where I live.

So! If you want to send me $1500 so I can get professionally diagnosed, then and only then will I hear out any counter argument you may have. I accept Cash App :)

Otherwise, just shut the fuck up.

scp-1337  asked:

Someone said I'm too social to be autistic what's your thoughts on that??

It’s a stereotype that autistic people either hate socializing or are terrible at it. I don’t know the specifics of your life, but if you’ve been raised as neurotypical then you likely picked up a lot of social skills that help you socialize and therefore blend in with the allistics (making eye contact, initiating conversations, etc). And obviously autistic people can be introverts or extroverts - if you’re a very social person it doesn’t make you any less autistic. I have a lot of friends myself, and I love talking to them. This doesn’t make me any less autistic, because “has no friends and does not have any desire for friends” is not a diagnostic criterium.

TL;DR: they clearly have no idea what they’re talking about and you are highly valid my dude

Autistic culture is being obsessed with the dwarvish tradition of telling stories about and naming items…I love doing that shit, I always have. I love talking about where and when I got each of my stuffed animals, or how I came into possession of all of my buttons and stickers, or when and where I created each of my favorite art pieces.

And,, that’s why it hurts so much when allistics interrupt me to talk about their own unrelated stuff, or say “you’re rambling” as a method of shutting me up.

Hey guys, I have a question for the community: is it an Autism Thing to have parts of you that are smaller than normal? For instance, my hands and feet look like they belong to a child (my shoe size atm is 3 in kids) and apparently at birth a family member suspected I might have something going on because they’ve always been smaller than normal.

Idk I’m just curious 🤷‍♀️

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Here’s my personal take on why autistic people so often experience gender dysphoria